How to Replace a Tag Heuer Watch Band

by David Hicks

Tag Heuer Style Watch

watch image by petar Ishmeriev from Fotolia.com

Tag Heuer is known worldwide for making superior quality Swiss watches. Produced since the 1860s, Tag watches are popular, and many watches (especially the F1 series) have both rubber and steel bracelets that can be used to create different looks. Changing the band on a Tag Heuer is not difficult, but it does require special tools.

Items you will need

  • Replacement band
  • Soft cloth
  • Spring bar tool (or another small, flat tool)
Step 1

Place the watch face down on top of the soft cloth to prevent damage while working on the band.

Step 2

Locate the point where the band and watch case connect--this point is commonly known as the lug of the watch. From the underside of the watch, locate the two small holes on either side of the bracelet in the lug. These allow access to the spring bars.

Step 3

Use the small forked end of the spring bar tool to push the small metal bar inside of the lug hole towards the watch bracelet. This will catch the bar and pull it out of the lug, allowing for a gentle pull to release the watch bracelet. Repeat this for both bracelet halves.

Step 4

Remove the spring bars from the old watch band, and place them in the replacement band.

Step 5

Place one half of the spring bar inside the lug, then use the spring bar tool to push down the other half of the bar. While compressed, slide that half of the band into the lugs. Pull the band to check that it has properly seated in the watch lug. Repeat for both sides of the band.

Tips

  • Your local jeweler can replace the band for you, and will often replace the band for free if purchased from them.

Warnings

  • Always be cautious using metal tools near your watch, as the watch body and crystal can easily be damaged.

Photo Credits

About the Author

David Hicks has recently graduated with a bachelor's degree in public affairs, with a focus on bioethics and social policy from a small private college in New York. He has been writing for more than 10 years, and spent the last four technical writing while not mired in schoolwork. Professionally, Hicks has published material on eHow, Answerbag and other websites.