How to Make "Star Wars" Birthday Invitations

by Caroline Baldwin

Don't forget to write "B.Y.O.L" -- bring your own lightsaber.

warioman/iStock/Getty Images

In a galaxy far, far away, parents search for the best invitation to their child’s “Star Wars” party. You don’t have to be one of those parents scrambling to find an invitation to fit your fete. Making your own invitation enables you to customize it to fit the movies or shows your child prefers or her favorite character. Use the Force and call all Jedis to your little one’s birthday party with creatively made invites.

Heading for Invitations

After speaking with the birthday honoree about preferences, determine if you would like to make your invitation a custom or nontraditional shape. Design the invitations to be cut out in the shape of a character’s head. Yoda, Darth Vader, R2-D2, Darth Maul, Boba or Jango Fett or a Storm Trooper is easily recognizable and gives you plenty of space for party information. Another alternative is to make a comic book for the invite. Print out a mini story about your child's Jedi training and have the party information at the end of the comic book. You also might print the invitations as “Star Wars” movie tickets. Use a photo of the characters from the movies, shows or LEGO series on the ticket. Sending a lightsaber invite will get kids excited about the party. Cut out the shapes from card stock and assemble them to look like the different colors of lightsabers. Make a 3-D lightsaber by covering an empty paper-towel roll or other tube with colored card stock. Wrap the bottom portion of the roll in black electrical tape or black card stock. Add some round circles to the handle to look like lightsaber buttons. Roll up the invitation, tie it with some twine and place it inside the tube. Leave some of the twine hanging out so the recipient sees the invite.

Far Away Font

Play with different font choices to see which one works best with the chosen invite. There are websites that offer free “Star Wars”-type fonts for download such as those similar to the one used for the “Star Wars” logo. You might use the “Star Wars”-type font for the heading and a regular font that coordinates, such as Impact or News Gothic, for the details of the party so it is easier to read. Play around with different versions of the invitation to find what works best.

Yoda-Speak Wording

“Star Wars” has some epic dialogue. A play off the iconic opening crawl of text from the movies is an ideal starting point. Start off with the age of the child, “Seven years ago in a galaxy far, far away, Jedi (insert child’s name) was born.” Add the information from the party while keeping the character of the movie; for example, “It is now time to finish his training as a Jedi Knight. Join this young Padawan and the Rebel Alliance to defeat the Dark Side at (time of party), on (date of party) at (place of party). May the Force be with you.” You may opt to tilt the font as the movie does as if it is crawling on the screen for effect. A simple wording option for a Yoda-themed invite is to place “Your Birthday, It Is” at the top and “Celebrate, You Must” at the bottom. Word the invite like an invite to a Jedi ceremony by writing the child’s name below the date and time of the party at the top of the invite. Add something like “Will be made a Jedi, marking his 7th birthday.” Include the remaining information at the bottom of the invitation.

Darth Delivery

Receiving the “Star Wars” invitation can be just as fun as the invitation itself. If you need to mail the invites, put them in envelopes decorated with images of “Star Wars” characters or ships. Have a character from the movies or shows hand deliver each invitation. Darth Vader ringing the doorbell of a child's home and silently handing her the invite is quite dramatic.

Photo Credits

  • warioman/iStock/Getty Images

About the Author

Caroline Baldwin, a corporate communications director located in South Carolina, began writing in 1998. Her work has been published in publications across the United States and Canada including Rolling Stone, Boating Life, Waterski and Wakeboarding magazines. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication studies from The College of Charleston.