How to Cut Your Bangs at Home

by Baird Daily

Bangs can highlight your eyes or cover a large forehead.

Polka Dot RF/Polka Dot/Getty Images

Save the time you spend running to the salon to get your bangs trimmed every few weeks. A haircut usually lasts one to two months, depending upon how quickly your hair grows. A bang trim is needed before then, if not for fashion's sake, then because you can't see. Cutting at home also allows you to experiment with different looks, such as side-swept bangs or a blunt cut, and to save money on trims. Always trim or cut dry bangs; wet hair will shrink when it dries.

Items you will need

  • Sharp scissors
  • Comb
  • Bobby pins
  • Mirror
Step 1

Find the point on your forehead where you want your bangs to start. This will be the bang line, the part of your hair that is brushed forward and over your brow. Remember that the higher on your scalp you go, the thicker the bangs will be. The width of your bang line should extend to the outer edges of your eyebrows. Use bobby pins to pin back the hair that will not be included in your bang line.

Step 2

Cut in the center and work your way outward. Cut hair 1/4 inch longer than you want it to be. You can always trim more if needed, but you cannot put hair back.

Step 3

Cut the ends of your hair with the scissors pointing upward. Cutting straight across can give you a "bowl cut."

Step 4

Cut hair shorter in the center and longer on the side near the outside point of your eyebrow for an angled or side-swept bang. You can choose either your left side or your right.

Tips

  • Curly hair will become curlier the shorter it is cut. Keep this in mind when creating bangs.

Warnings

  • Be cautious when using sharp scissors near your face and eyes.

Photo Credits

  • Polka Dot RF/Polka Dot/Getty Images

About the Author

Baird Daily is an English instructor. She is published in the "World Literary Review" and has written about music and arts for the "Daily Athenaeum." She holds a B.A. and M.A. from Western Virginia University and is a doctoral student at the University of Kentucky.