How to Make Your Own Cologne

by Tricia Goss

Hygiene is an important part of feeling confident and good about yourself. Men and women both enjoy smelling fresh, clean and attractive. According to a survey by marketing research company NPD Group, Americans spend nearly two billion dollars each year on women's fragrances alone. These perfumes and colognes can be expensive, and the cheaper versions often smell, well, cheap. Even if you are on a tight budget, you can still have a signature scent by making it yourself.

Items you will need

  • 100-proof vodka
  • Distilled water
  • Essential oils or fragrance oils
  • Glass perfume bottle or glass bottle with stopper
  • Liquid measuring cup
Step 1

Determine how much cologne your perfume bottle will hold by filling it with water and pouring it into a measuring cup. This will help you establish how much alcohol, water and fragrance to use.

Step 2

Fill the bottle about 3/4 full of alcohol. For example, if your bottle holds 4 ounces, you would pour in about 3 ounces of the vodka.

Step 3

Fill another 25 to 30 percent of the bottle with distilled water. It is important to use distilled water, because it has been purified and is free of chemicals that might interfere with the fragrance.

Step 4

Drop a mixture of fragrance or essential oils into the alcohol and water mixture one drop at a time. Stick to one or two fragrances for your first batch if you are nervous about mixing scents.

Step 5

Close the bottle tightly and shake it well. Allow it to sit in a cool, dark or shaded area for about a week, shaking it every one to two days. The scents will blend together, becoming rich and mellow.

Tips

  • Shake well before each use, as the alcohol can separate from the fragrant water.

Warnings

  • Some people are sensitive or allergic to fragrance and essential oils. Test a small amount on the inside of your wrist before using it.

About the Author

Tricia Goss' credits include Fitness Plus, Good News Tucson and Layover Magazine. She is certified in Microsoft application and served as the newsletter editor for OfficeUsers.org. She has also contributed to The Dollar Stretcher, Life Tips and Childcare Magazine.