How to Make a Bandana Bracelet

by Linda Johnson

Those big bandanna cuff bracelets you see on men and women are easy to make. You can create a bandanna bracelet in five minutes, and have a great casual look. In fact, you can use any handkerchief or cloth square to make a fashionable fabric cuff for your wrist. When your bandanna bracelet becomes soiled, you can pop it in the washer, and start fresh the next time you want to wear it.

Items you will need

  • Bandanna
  • Your hands
  • Safety pin (optional)
  • Needle and thread (optional)
Step 1

Spread your bandanna out on a flat surface.

Step 2

Fold the bandanna in half as a triangle.

Step 3

Start with the tip of the triangle and begin making tight folds lengthwise. You should end up with a long narrow strip of folded fabric.

Step 4

Leave an inch of the folded bandanna loose on the underside of your wrist, and wrap the rest of it tightly around your wrist again and again until there is just enough left on the end to tie to the loose strip on the other end.

Step 5

Tie the ends together in a knot and poke the tails inside the fabric cuff. If you wish, you can secure the knot with a big safety-pin and leave it showing, for extra "attitude."

Tips

  • If you prefer no knot, wrap the bandanna strip around your wrist until there are only one or two inches loose at the ends. Then lay one end over the other and stitch them together. This will mean you need to tear out the stitches to remove or launder your bandanna bracelet.
    To make a bandanna ring, cut a narrow strip of cloth out of a bandanna and wrap it around your finger as you did your wrist.

Warnings

  • Depending on the size of your wrist, a regular size folded bandanna may wrap around more or less times. Experiment until you know where to start the wrap so that the ends are equal, and are on the underside of your wrist.

Photo Credits

  • LJohnson adaptation

About the Author

Linda Johnson is a veteran writer and Photoshop and Illustrator aficionado. She is a TV-radio producer, ad agency owner and a winner of Addy Awards and the First Place Award for Best National Public Service Film. In addition to Johnson's online work, her writing has appeared in "Poetry Guide," the "Indianapolis Star" and Indianapolis Dine magazine.