How to Make a Genie Veil

by Melissa Monks ; Updated September 28, 2017

The genie is a popular choice for Halloween costumes

lampada image by haruspex from Fotolia.com

People dress up in costumes to experience the exotic, the frightening, and the bizarre. And there aren't too many costumes more exotic than the genie. The brightly colored, diaphanous clothes coupled with the capability to grant wild wishes, make the genie a popular choice for Halloween or any other costume occasion. One of the most iconic, mysterious, and necessary parts of this alluring costume is the veil.

How to Make a Genie Veil

Cover the headband. Measure your headband from end to end and measure its width. Cut a strip of satin that is length of your headband, but double the width plus a half an inch. On the underside of the headband, using the glue gun, glue the satin lengthwise to the headband. On one of the unglued corners of satin, sew one side of the snap to the satin. Wrap the headband with the satin strip and glue the other edge of the satin to the underside on the headband. Your headband should be covered, set it aside and let the glue cool.

Make the front of the veil. You should have about 69 inches of fabric left, cut it in half and set one half aside. On one corner of the satin rectangle (it doesn't matter which corner), sew the other half of the snap. Affix the snap to its mate on the headband. Take the opposite corner along the long edge and glue it to the opposite side of the headband.

Make the back of the veil. With the remaining satin, you'll make the back portion of the veil. Simply glue the shorter edge of the fabric to the underside of the headband. The curve in the headband will create some gather in the fabric, but feel free to gather it as you glue if you'd like to.

Tips

  • If you want to be able to remove the entire front portion of the veil (a great idea for younger children), you could affix snaps to both sides of the headband and fabric. Also, any type of light, airy fabric will work. Using satin is not a necessity.

Photo Credits

About the Author

Melissa Monks began writing professionally in 2003 and spent four years writing for the Beutler Heating and Air company newsletter. She also spent two years as a content director for StoryMash.com, publishing projects and blogs, and has worked as a research assistant for One On One, a company publishing educational material. Monks received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Utah.