Types of Hair Scissors

by Scott Damon

Learn about the different types of hair scissors.

Cutting hair image by lefebvre_jonathan from Fotolia.com

You might notice that your hairstylist or barber uses different scissors to cut your hair. Each of these scissors performs differently to sculpt your haircut. Depending on your hair type and desired style, a stylist may use all or just some of the scissors in his arsenal.

Thinning Shears

Thinning shears are also referred to as texturizing or chunking shears. The base of the shears is similar to that of any other scissors, with loops for the thumb and index finger. These scissors are made for either left-handed or right-handed stylists. The top of the scissors varies greatly, however. Instead of two long "shears," the top blade contains widely spaced teeth that remove only some of the hair with each cut to thin it without changing its style. These shears are used for sections of hair that tend to get thick in proportion to the rest of the head, such as the sides and back.

Razor Shears

The razor shear is another texturizing tool. The base of the razor shear is one loop for the stylist's index finger. The top of the razor shear is a single blade; therefore, this shear doesn't make an actual cutting motion. The stylist holds the hair in one hand and uses the single blade in the other hand to make small texturized cuts. This gives hair a natural texture by varying its length.

Regular Shears

Most haircuts are performed with a pair of regular shears. These shears resemble the scissors that we use at home, with holes for the index finger and thumb at one end and two blades that meet when a cut is made. Styles of shear vary; most are 4.5 to 6.5 inches long. Size and shape are selected for the stylist's comfort: Some shears have a curved bottom that allows a more natural hand position.

Photo Credits

  • Cutting hair image by lefebvre_jonathan from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Scott Damon is a Web content specialist who has written for a multitude of websites dating back to 2007. Damon covers a variety of topics including personal finance, small business, sports, food and travel, among many others.