Pregnancy Gift for a Daughter

by M.T. Wroblewski ; Updated March 15, 2018

Celebrate your daughter's pregnancy with a gift.

pregnant woman image by Valentin Mosichev from Fotolia.com

The time will come to buy a crib that complements the nursery. And you have time before you’ll be ready to push a high-tech stroller or place a bowl of oatmeal on the tray of a “smart” high chair. For now, while you’re basking in the novelty of your daughter’s pregnancy, you want a gift that will celebrate your relationship with your daughter and the life that is growing inside of her. This is a time for a thoughtful gift that reflects your love for your child and your concern for her condition in the crucial months ahead.

The Gift: A Body Pillow

Why she’ll love it: Mothers-to-be tire easily in the early months of their pregnancy but need plenty of rest throughout it. The length and thickness of a body pillow takes pressure off key pressure points, and it supports your daughter comfortably so she can grab a nap during the day and sleep comfortably through the night. Although people with a variety of conditions use body pillows now, some of the earliest pillows were designed by nurses and mothers – people like you, who know exactly what your daughter is feeling.

The Gift: A Pregnancy Journal

Why she’ll love it: Every day brings a new discovery for an expectant mother, especially if this is her first pregnancy. And the first day she feels the baby stir within her? That is a day she’ll want to record where she was and what she was doing, just like all the other “firsts,” such as her first sonogram. Of course, if emotion gets the best of your daughter and she cannot put her feelings into words, you can always reminisce about your pregnancy with her. The parallels and feelings you share could make the journal a lifetime treasure.

The Gift: A Glider Chair

Why she’ll love it: A comfortable “glider” combines the comfort of a plush recliner without the unsteady, swooping motions of a rocker. The lumbar reinforcement ensures that your daughter will get the physical support she needs while her body swells with pregnancy. After the baby is born, she can nestle in the chair and feed your grandchild or lull the baby to sleep. Glider chairs are often covered in easy-to-clean microfiber, which makes them well suited to any room in the house. They also deflect spills effortlessly – everything from green tea to baby formula.

The Gift: A Heated Foot Spa

Why she’ll love it: A foot spa is a gift your daughter would probably never buy for herself. As her body stretches out in new directions, her aching, swelling feet will rebound after a short dip in a foot spa. If your daughter (mildly) objects to the indulgence, remind her that she takes vitamins to fortify her internal being and fight fatigue. But what about her feet? They’re often the forgotten component of a pregnant woman’s regimen. Include some Epsom salts or a pedicure kit as a thoughtful side gift.

The Gift: A Parent-Child Pendant

Why she’ll love it: At first glance, your daughter will see that the pendant is an artful depiction of the life growing inside of her. The dominant section of the pendant forms a shape that resembles the letter “C,” while a crescent, representing a baby, is cradled along the curved, bottom edge. These pendants are available at a wide variety of price points, depending on the type of stone: diamonds or birthstones. Even if you choose a sleek and simple design, your daughter should recognize the bigger point: You gave her life, and now she is carrying on your legacy of love. What’s more, she will carry this recognition close to her heart.

Photo Credits

  • pregnant woman image by Valentin Mosichev from Fotolia.com

About the Author

If you can't see the world, then you may as well try to meet (or at least talk to) everyone in it. So goes the hopeful thinking of many journalists, including Mary Wroblewski. This is why you'll see her work in a wide variety of publications, especially those in the business, education, health care and nutrition genres. Mary came of age as a reporter and editor in some of Chicago's scrappiest newsrooms but softened up long enough to write nine children's books as well as one nonfiction tome.