How to Put on a Bandana on Your Head

by Ainsley Patterson

A bandana, a simple square piece of fabric, is a versatile item to own as it can be worn around the neck and head, and can be used in several different craft and sewing projects. Learn to fold and tie a bandana onto your head as a doo-rag or as a headband to keep your hair out of your face. A doo-rag also prevents helmet hair and keeps the sun off the top of your head.

Doo-Rag

Step 1

Fold the handkerchief in half diagonally to create a triangle. Press the folded edge with your hand to crease it neatly.

Step 2

Place the middle of the folded edge in the middle of your forehead with the point of the triangle above the fold. The point of the triangle with likely naturally flop over to rest on top of your head. Tie the two side corners of the triangle behind your head.

Step 3

Bring the point of the triangle over the top of your head and tuck it in underneath the knotted corners in the back of your head if the bandana is large enough. This method for wearing a bandana keeps you hair out of your face and can also help prevent helmet hair.

Headband

Step 1

Fold the bandana in half to form a triangle. Take the folded triangle and fold it up toward the opposite point roughly 2 inches; you don't need to be exact. Repeat this fold until the entire triangle has been folded up to create a band.

Step 2

Place the middle of the band on top of your head, just behind the hairline. Bring the ends of the band back around and under your hair at the back of your head.

Step 3

Tie the ends of the band together in a double knot. Be careful not to get your hair tangled into the knot -you may want to flip your head upside down while you tie the knot to move your hair out of the way.

Photo Credits

  • Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images

About the Author

Based in Ypsilanti, Mich., Ainsley Patterson has been a freelance writer since 2007. Her articles appear on various websites. She especially enjoys utilizing her more than 10 years of craft and sewing experience to write tutorials. Patterson is working on her bachelor's degree in liberal arts at the University of Michigan.