How to Open the Back of a Croton Watch

by Floyd Drake III

Founded in 1878 in the Italian town of Croton, Croton watches combine Italian style with Swiss watch movement. Croton watches are known for high quality at an affordable price. Currently owned by Nationwide Time, popular Croton models include the Reliance, Diver and Manhattan. Opening the back of a quality watch can be a tedious process, as they are secured tightly to keep out dust and water. Croton watch backs, as with most quality watches, are either screw-off or pressure-fit. With the proper tools, Croton watch backs can be opened, allowing battery changes and repairs.

Items you will need

  • Master waterproof case opener (optional)
  • 4-inch Swiss watch case opener (optional)

Screw-Off Watch Backs

Step 1

Determine if the Croton watch has a screw-off watch back. Screw-off watch backs, commonly used on waterproof watches, have three notches around the edge. This watch type requires a master waterproof case opener with different bits to fit various notch sizes. Master waterproof case openers are available online.

Step 2

Place the proper bits into the case opener. Size up the proper bits to the notches, then mount them into the case opener.

Step 3

Open the watch back. Align each bit into the notches and turn the wrench counterclockwise until the Croton watch back is opened.

Pressure-Fit Watch Backs

Step 1

Find the notch. Pressure-fit watch backs have a single notch around the watch's back edge, designed for a Swiss watch case opener. The rest of the watch back is normally smooth.

Step 2

Insert a 4-inch Swiss watch case opener into the notch and begin to gently pry the watch back off.

Step 3

Continue prying until the watch back is removed. As the back begins to loosen, you can move the tool to the opposite side to pry the back off evenly.

Tips

  • Remove the Croton watch back in a clean work area to prevent dirt from entering the watch's mechanics.

Warnings

  • Do not force anything while removing the watch back. If excessive force is required to turn the case opener, or pry the back off, stop and take it to a professional before the watch is damaged.

Photo Credits

  • Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images

About the Author

A native of New Haven, Conn., Floyd Drake III began writing in 1984. His work has appeared in the "New Haven Register," Medford's "Mail-Tribune" and the "Ashland Daily Tidings." Drake studied journalism at Southern Connecticut State University. After working as a reporter in Oregon, he is now based back home in New Haven.