How to Adjust Relic Watch Bands

by Megan Mattingly-Arthur

Manufactured by Fossil, Relic brand watches provide wearers with fashionable, user-friendly watches at affordable prices. If your Relic watch band is too big, you may not have to take it to a jeweler to have it adjusted. Many Relic watch models feature wearer-adjustable bands. In most cases, even the Relic watch bands that weren't intended to be adjusted by the wearer can be adjusted at home with the right tools.

Items you will need

  • Optical cleaning cloth
  • Optical-size flat-head screwdriver
  • Link pin removal tool or thumbtack

Relic Adjust-A-Link Watch Bands

Step 1

Lay your watch face down on an optical cleaning cloth on a flat work surface, like a desk or table. The soft optical cleaning cloth will protect the face of your watch from being scratched while you adjust your watch band.

Step 2

Find the links on the side of the band without the watch clasp. Note the small tab in the center of each watch link.

Step 3

Use an optical-size flat-head screwdriver to pry up the center tab of the last watch link. Lift the tab to open the small clasp that secures the last link to its neighboring link.

Step 4

Remove the last watch link. Repeat the process to remove additional links, if desired.

Relic Link Pin Watch Bands

Step 1

Spread an optical cleaning cloth over a flat work surface to protect the face of your Relic watch during link adjustment.

Step 2

Look at the last link on the side of the band without the watch clasp. Note the small pin that joins the last link to the link next to it.

Step 3

Use a link pin removal tool, or a thumbtack, to push out the link pin that holds the last watch link in place. Repeat the process to remove additional links, as needed.

Tips

  • Keep removed watch links and link pins in case one of your watch's links gets scratched or damaged.

Warnings

  • Self-adjusting the band on Relic link pin watch bands may void your watch's warranty.

References (2)

Photo Credits

About the Author

Megan Mattingly-Arthur has been writing professionally since 1998. She has contributed to various publications, including "Teen Voices" and "Positive Teens" magazines, as well as a book, "The Young Writer's Guide to Getting Published." Mattingly-Arthur is studying travel and tourism through Penn Foster Career School.