Wording Ideas for Western Party Invitations

by Liza Hollis

For a Western-themed party, theme decorations are an important first step.

Sunset Cowboy image by Rob Duffy from Fotolia.com

Set the tone for any themed party with the invitations. This is your invitee's first look at what's in store for them. For a Western-themed party, send out invitations that feature boots, cowboy hats, ropes and sheriff's badges; or create an invitation that looks like a wanted poster. The wording you use will provide the next clue to the event–make your language as appropriate to the theme as the images and format you choose.

Introduction

Create an introduction that introduces the party's theme. Open with a "Yeehaw" or "Howdy, pod'ner." This wording should be presented in an Old West-style typeface, reminiscent of those used on handbills or wanted posters. Place the wording over a bandana or wood grain background. Describe the party you are hosting as a "roundup," "hoedown" or a "grand ol' time." These clues will give your guests an idea of what they can expect from the event.

Important Information

The heart of the invitation will include the time, date and location of the event; use Western speak for this part of the invitation as well. For example, instead of saying “The party will begin at 12 p.m. at Mr. and Mrs. Jones’ home,” write, “Mosey on down to the Jones' corral at high noon.” Ask guests to “saddle up” instead of arrive at a certain location. Don't ask guests to RSVP, tell them to "give you a holler.” (see Resources)

Theme-Specific Ideas

Another idea for a Western-themed party invitation is to format it in the style of an Old West wanted poster. Write in large, capital letters on the front of the invitation: “WANTED ALIVE: You at the Party!” Use a Western-style typeface or one that looks like it's written in with a rope. Include a reward for anyone who shows up in their Western duds.

Photo Credits

About the Author

Liza Hollis has been writing for print and online publications since 2003. Her work has appeared on various digital properties, including USAToday.com. Hollis earned a degree in English Literature from the University of Florida.