How to Use Essential Oils Instead of Deodorant

by S.R. Becker ; Updated September 28, 2017

Dilute essential oils in a carrier oil to use as deodorant.

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If you're trying to use more natural products or live more frugally, replacing your antiperspirant or commercial deodorant with essential oils is one step you can take. Some oils, such as bergamot, tea tree, lavender, eucalyptus and sage have deodorizing properties. If you don't have much body odor or perspiration, this may be all you need to stay smelling fresh. Because they are highly concentrated, essential oils must be mixed with a carrier oil before applying them to your skin. Adding a perspiration-absorbing powder to the oil provides wetness protection.

Melt 3 tablespoons of coconut oil and 2 tablespoons of shea butter in a saucepan over low heat, stirring constantly. Pour the melted oil into a bowl.

Add 2 tablespoons of cornstarch or arrowroot powder and 3 tablespoons of baking soda.

Add 10 drops of essential oil. Try a blend of lavender, tea tree, eucalyptus, peppermint, bergamot and sage until you determine the combination you like best.

Stir the mixture well until all the ingredients are thoroughly combined. Scoop it into a glass jar.

Store the glass jar in the refrigerator to help it last longer. Dab a small amount under your armpits every day and rub it in well.

Tips

  • Natural deodorants sometimes need to be reapplied throughout the day, especially if you work out or sweat a lot. You can also use essential oils without adding the powdered ingredients. Mix the other ingredients as indicated above and allow the mixture to set. In the summer months, you will probably have to refrigerate it to keep it from liquefying in the jar.

Photo Credits

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About the Author

S.R. Becker is a certified yoga teacher based in Queens, N.Y. She has a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing and has worked as a writer and editor for more than 15 years. Becker often writes for "Yoga in Astoria," a newsletter about studios throughout New York City.