How to Remove the Bezel on a Seiko Watch

by David Hicks

Seiko has been producing watches since 1881 when Kintaro Hattori opened a small watch shop in Tokyo, Japan. This store evolved into the modern-day Seiko company, known for producing affordable and durable watches, as well as some of the most technically advanced timepieces available. Many Seiko watches, especially diving watches, have a movable bezel (a metal ring that circles the face). You would need to remove the bezel if you want to replace a damaged one or to change the color and, therefore, the look of the watch. Removing the bezel on a Seiko watch requires some preparation of the correct tools and steady hands.

Items you will need

  • Soft cloth
  • Masking tape
  • Pocket knife (thin)
Step 1

Lay the watch face up on the soft cloth, to prevent scratching the watch.

Step 2

Remove a few strips of masking tape, then slide them underneath the watch bezel. These are used to protect the case of the watch when you use leverage to remove the bezel.

Step 3

Slide the pocket knife blade under one side of the bezel, on top of the masking tape. Rotate the knife gently downwards to pop off the bezel. If you have problems getting the bezel to pop off, hold the knife blade in a set of pliers or other grips to get better leverage.

Step 4

Remove the bezel by lifting upwards. Be careful to leave any spring under the bezel in place, as that is what allows the bezel to click while turning.

Step 5

Replace the Seiko bezel (or add a new bezel) by placing it in the proper alignment above the watch, then pushing gently on both sides at the same time until it clicks back into place. After testing that it works, your watch will be ready to wear.

Tips

  • If you are nervous about the bezel change, a local jeweler will perform the service for a small charge on most watches.

Photo Credits

  • luxury orange watch image by The Blowfish Inc from Fotolia.com

About the Author

David Hicks has recently graduated with a bachelor's degree in public affairs, with a focus on bioethics and social policy from a small private college in New York. He has been writing for more than 10 years, and spent the last four technical writing while not mired in schoolwork. Professionally, Hicks has published material on eHow, Answerbag and other websites.