How to Make Egg Shampoo

by Grace Phan ; Updated September 28, 2017

While the thought of eggs may bring to mind your Sunday morning breakfast, they can also come in handy for your weekly pamper routine. Eggs are deeply cleansing, and filled with protein that conditions and strengthens the hair. Egg shampoo is effective for all hair types, particularly those with dry hair who are trying to avoid drying sulphates. Set aside an egg from the pancake stash and whip up some shampoo for lush and healthy tresses.

Pour the egg and organic honey into a bowl. Use a whisk to mix them together until fully blended. Honey, a natural humectant, will thicken the mixture, while further conditioning your hair.

Tips

    • For oily hair, add one mashed banana instead of honey. The potassium in a banana gently softens hair. 
    • If you have ultra-dry or coarse hair, add 1 teaspoon of olive or coconut oil for added conditioning. 

Add 1/4 cup of lukewarm or cold water to the bowl -- avoid hot water, as it will cook the egg -- and gently whisk until blended to a thick consistency. The water will allow the shampoo to go further.

Tips

  • Double the amount of water used for hair that is longer than shoulder length.

Wet your hair with warm water, and pour the shampoo over your scalp and the lengths of your hair. Use your hands to work it through your hair from root to tip.

Allow the shampoo to sink in for five minutes. Pull on a shower cap if necessary.

Tips

  • To use the shampoo as a deep-conditioning mask, pull on a shower cap and hover a blow-dryer 5 inches above your hair for three minutes. The heat will help the honey and protein to sink in to the follicles.

Rinse the shampoo thoroughly from your hair with lukewarm or cool water.

Tips

  • Only use this egg wash once every two weeks, as protein can make hair stiff if overused. Use a regular shampoo formulated for your hair type in between treatments.

About the Author

Grace Phan is a trained hairstylist and aesthetician with a penchant for natural and DIY beauty. At the age of six she was skimming from her parents avocado supply to whip up face masks, and hasn't looked back. A graduate of the Atlanta Institute of Aesthetics, she loves working with all hair textures and skin types to create routines that can be practiced at home.