How to Clean a Round Hair Brush

by Sidney Johns

Finding the right brush for the texture of your hair can give you a real sense of accomplishment, and holding on to that brush can become next to obsession. The round brush has a special place in hairstyling, assisting in straightening or curling depending on its user. Keeping these brushes clean is a must. Dirt and particles can build up on the brushes and transfer readily to your scalp if not cared for properly.

Items you will need

  • Round Hairbrush
  • Rat tail comb
  • Baking Soda
  • Shampoo
Step 1

Place the end of a rat tail comb under the hair trapped in your brush and pull upward between the bristles to remove. Make several passes with the comb tail between each set of bristles to remove all or as much hair as possible. Round brushes usually contain more sets of bristles, so keep at it.

Step 2

Pour a small amount of shampoo onto the bristles, turning the brush as you apply. Wet with water. Rub the shampoo into all the bristle area with your hand and rinse the brush thoroughly. Turn the brush frequently during the process to assure that all bristles are clean and rinsed.

Step 3

Prepare warm water in your bathroom sink. Add a half cup of baking soda and allow to dissolve. Soak your hair brush for about 15 minutes. This will remove any styling gels, hairsprays or most other hair preparations from your brush. Rinse well and air dry.

Tips

  • Clean your brushes at least once a week. This will keep dirt and debris from building.

Warnings

  • Wooden bodied, padded and boar's hair brushes should not be submerged in water. Each kind will absorb moisture and can develop mold or mildew. Eliminate the soaking process for these types and stick to using your shampoo to clean.

Photo Credits

  • Jack Hollingsworth/Photodisc/Getty Images

About the Author

Sidney Johns began her writing career in 1993 after moving to Florida. The former teacher and surgical technician worked in the home improvement industry prior to earning a Bachelor of Science in education from Indiana University. While on hiatus in 2004, Johns studied holistic healing and organic growth and gardening.