How to Make a Wedding Core Lasso

by Rosenya Faith

Pass down a family keepsake cross by adding it to the wedding lasso.

Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

Items you will need

  • Thin-gauge jewelry wire
  • Crimp ends
  • Thin-nose pliers
  • 4 mm crystal beads
  • 8 mm imitation pearl beads
  • Jump ring
  • Religious cross (optional)

A wedding lasso is draped around the shoulders of a bride and groom during a traditional Hispanic wedding ceremony, following the wedding prayer to symbolize eternity. The lasso can be made from a variety of materials, such as rosary beads, crystals, pearls, ribbons or flowers. You can make a wedding lasso for the upcoming nuptials of a close friend or family member from imitation pearls and crystal beads for a thoughtful but inexpensive keepsake gift for the couple.

Step 1

Cut a length of thin-gauge jewelry wire to a length of 42 inches and thread a crimp end onto one end of the wire. Thread the end of the wire through the crimp end, make a loop in the wire and thread the end back through the crimp end. Squeeze the crimp end tightly with thin-nose pliers to secure the crimp end onto the wire.

Step 2

Thread five of the 4 mm crystal beads onto the jewelry wire, slide the beads to the crimp end and then slide an 8 mm imitation pearl bead onto the wire.

Step 3

Repeat the above step until you end up approximately 1 inch from the end of the wire.

Step 4

Thread a crimp end onto the 1-inch-long wire end, make a loop from the wire and thread it back through the crimp end. Pinch the crimp end closed with the pliers.

Step 5

Open a jump ring and hook it onto the loops of both crimp ends.

Step 6

Hook a cross onto the open jump ring for a religious couple. Squeeze the jump ring closed with the pliers.

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

About the Author

Rosenya Faith has been working with children since the age of 16 as a swimming instructor and dance instructor. For more than 14 years she has worked as a recreation and skill development leader, an early childhood educator and a teaching assistant, working in elementary schools and with special needs children between 4 and 11 years of age.