How to Iron a Uniform Shirt

by Jessica Felix ; Updated September 28, 2017

Although many of those in uniform choose to let the dry cleaner do the ironing, it's actually quite easy for anyone to iron a uniform shirt. It's important for those in the military and law enforcement to have a clean, well-pressed uniform when reporting for duty on the job. With all of the pleats, patches and pockets on a uniform shirt, it can be tricky to know where to start.

Set up your ironing board. Fill your iron with cold water to the line marked on the reservoir, or about 1/3 cup.

Plug in the iron and turn the heat to a synthetic setting, such as polyester. Wait a few minutes for the iron to heat.

Lay the uniform shirt out on the board and flip the collar up. Iron the collar from both sides by turning the uniform shirt over.

Fold the sleeves from the shoulder seam down to the ends to create a crease. Fold the badge on the arm in half. Iron over this fold from both sides to set the crease in for a crisp line. Repeat this step with the other sleeve.

Turn the uniform shirt over so that the back of the shirt faces up. Begin ironing with the iron pointed at the top of the shirt. Start with the area around the collar. Carefully avoid any pleating around this area.

Move the iron to the bottom of the back of the uniform shirt and iron each panel from bottom to top with the tip of the iron pointing up at all times. Turn the uniform shirt as each panel is ironed.

Iron the front panel in the same manner. Carefully iron around the front pocket. Switch to the other front panel and turn the shirt again as each panel is ironed.

Hang the pressed uniform shirt to avoid any wrinkling.

Tip

  • When owning many uniform shirts, iron them in the same session to avoid needing to iron every day.

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About the Author

Jessica Felix graduated from Western Washington University with a major in Education. Felix has been writing for six years and teaches child development classes to professionals and parents. She is also a certified parenting educator offering coaching and classes to families with young children.