How to Hide a Shoelace

by Tobias Starr

Most people wear their shoelaces visible to anyone that can see the top of their shoe. Some people prefer the look of a hidden knot, or simply want to hide excessively long laces. There are several simple ways of hiding shoelaces so that the look you want to achieve is present; but the shoe also successfully stays tight and fits well on the foot.

Under the Tongue

Step 1

Lace your shoes using the over-under method or the criss-cross method.

Step 2

Pull on both loose ends of the laces to tighten them so that they’re comfortable but will stay on your feet.

Step 3

Pull the ends of the laces back behind the tongue of your sneaker.

Step 4

Tie the laces in a criss-cross knot or bow behind the tongue.

Step 5

Pull the tongue down over the top of your foot. Arrange the laces so that they feel comfortable under the tongue.

Double-Lacing

Step 1

Lace your shoes using the over-under method or the criss-cross method.

Step 2

Pull on both loose ends of the laces to tighten them so that they’re comfortable but will stay on your feet.

Step 3

Double-lace the end by pushing the right lace through the last hole that the left lace is coming through; then push the left lace through the last hole the right lace is through. This will keep the laces tight on the sneaker without having to tie a knot, and it will also shorten the excess laces.

Step 4

Tuck the right and left lace into the shoe where you ankles or sides of your feet go in.

Step 5

Arrange the laces so they are comfortable.

Ankle Wrap

Step 1

Lace your shoes using the over-under method or the criss-cross method.

Step 2

Pull on both loose ends of the laces to tighten them so that they’re comfortable but will stay on your feet.

Step 3

Wrap the excess laces around your ankle and tie in a criss-cross bow or knot. This look is best under long pants to hide the laces around your ankle.

Photo Credits

About the Author

Tobias Starr has been writing professionally since 2010. Her specialties include fashion/beauty articles, literary analysis pieces and the occasional commentary on cultural issues. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a minor in speech communication and a Master of Arts in secondary education, both from Morehead State University.