Homemade Polish Kluski Noodles

by Helen Sterling

Kluski are frequently added to soup

clear soup with noodles image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com

Items you will need

  • Klartoflane Kluski - Potato Dumplings
  • 4 qts. water
  • 2 cups mashed potatoes, leftovers work well
  • 1/3 cup fine breadcrumbs
  • 2 eggs, separated, whites beaten until stiff
  • 3/4 tsp. salt, additional 1 tsp. for cooking water
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • Kluski Kladzione - Polish Laid Noodles
  • 4 qts. water
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cups warm water
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tbsp. melted butter
  • 1 tsp. salt, plus 1 tsp. for cooking water
  • Teaspoon
  • Kluski - Noodles
  • 4 qts. water
  • 4 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt, plus 1/4 tsp. for cooking water
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • Milk or water as needed to achieve the desired consistency
  • Rolling pin or pasta machine
  • Pizza cutter or sharp knife

For many, the word “kluski” brings to mind the wide egg noodles sold in packages in the grocery store. Kluski is the Polish word for noodles, but it also refers to unfilled potato dumplings. Kluski is a staple in Polish cooking, made quickly with a minimum of ingredients and adaptable to a wide range of dishes.

Dumplings can be served by themselves, covered with melted butter and a pinch of salt, or with gravy or sauce, or serve them as a side dish with a main course. Noodles are added to chicken and other flavorful soups. Either way, kluski are a delicious and hearty addition to any meal.

Kartoflane Kluski - Potato Dumplings

Step 1

Add 1 tsp. salt to 4 quarts of water. Bring to a boil.

Step 2

Combine the mashed potatoes, breadcrumbs, egg yolks, egg whites, salt, pepper and flour in a bowl. Mix just until the mixture holds together. If the dough becomes too sticky, mix in a spoonful of flour at a time.

Step 3

Turn the mixture out on a floured surface, forming a rough loaf shape. Use a sharp knife to cut the dough into 2- by 3-inch dumplings.

Step 4

Drop the dumplings individually into the boiling salted water. Boil 7 to 10 minutes. When fully cooked, the dumplings will float to the surface. Remove and drain.

Polish Laid Noodles - Kluski Kladzione

Step 1

Add 1 tsp. salt to 4 quarts of water. Bring to a boil.

Step 2

Break the eggs into a mixing bowl and mix well. Add the water and mix until combined. Stir in the melted butter.

Step 3

Add the flour to the egg mixture gradually, until all the flour is incorporated. Turn dough out onto a floured surface and shape into a rough loaf shape.

Step 4

Use the edge of a teaspoon to cut crescent-shaped dumplings from the dough approximately 3/4 inch thick and approximately 2- to 3-inches long. Drop the dumplings into the boiling salted water and cook for 7 to 10 minutes. They will float to the surface of the water when fully cooked. Remove and drain.

Egg Noodles - Kluski

Step 1

Add 1 tsp. salt to 4 quarts of water. Bring to a boil. Alternatively, if you're making soup, have the soup made and at near boiling before making the kluski.

Step 2

Mix all the ingredients in a large bowl until combined.

Step 3

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Use a rolling pin or pasta machine to roll the dough to approximately 1/8-inch thick. Use a sharp knife or pizza cutter to cut the dough into noodles 1- inch by 2-inches in size.

Step 4

Cook the noodles in boiling salted water or soup for 7 to 9 minutes.

Tips

  • If you’re making soup, you can cook the kluski right in the same pot. Just add the kluski to near-boiling soup and wait for them to rise to the top when they’re cooked.

    For noodles, the amount of water or milk needed may depend on variables such as the size of the eggs or the humidity in the room. Add water a little at a time until the dough reaches the right consistency.

    Do not crowd kluski when cooking. Work in batches if necessary. Otherwise kluski, especially the dumplings, will stick together and not cook fully.

Photo Credits

  • clear soup with noodles image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Located in south-central Wisconsin, Helen Sterling is a freelance writer who has been writing online since 2004. Sterling's background is in human resources where she has written and edited numerous policy and procedure manuals for both corporate and manufacturing companies. She publishes articles on crafts for various websites and enjoys making complex projects easy to understand. Sterling also owns a jewelry-design business.