Fun Women's Church Games

by Shelley Frost

Church games for women work well for retreats, ministries and other group settings.

church image by graham tomlin from Fotolia.com

Women's church games break the ice with a small or large group. Whether all of the women know one another or have never met, the games help open up the group for more serious discussions and activities. The entertaining format of the games gets everyone laughing and have a good time so they are more willing to participate in the other activities.

Purse Scavenger Hunt

Most women bring their purses with them wherever they go. This game sends the women on a search through their own purses to find certain items. Create a list of items, some of which are common in purses and others that aren't as common. Ideas include a nail file, safety pin, lip balm, money clip, coupons, floss, calculator, foreign money, a grocery receipt with a total between a certain range and a passport. Call out the items one at a time. The first person to produce the item gets a point or a small prize.

Ice Breaker Bingo

This game uses a grid similar to a Bingo board with five rows of five squares. In each square, write a fact that could be true about someone. Examples include born in a foreign country, visited all 50 states, plays a particular instrument, drives a hybrid vehicle or has been on a cruise. You can also tailor the statements to a more religious theme to fit the church atmosphere. Each woman gets a copy of the grid with all of the facts in the square. They mingle with one another and find someone who has done each thing in the grid. The person signs her name in the square. If you have enough women participating, add the restriction that a participant can only sign one square on each other woman's board. For example, if someone was born in a foreign country and has been to all 50 states, she can only sign one of those squares on each person's grid. There are several ways to determine the winner. One way is to award a prize to the first person who gets five signatures in a row vertically, horizontally or diagonally. Another option is to award a prize to the first person to get all squares signed.

Mingling Trivia

Create a card for each woman in attendance. Each card has a different getting-to-know-you question on it, such as where you were born, what are your hobbies or how you found your current church. The women mingle and ask each other their questions. The goal is to talk to all of the other women and ask them your one question. The women take notes on the answers they receive. After a set amount of mingling time, participants come back as a group and discuss the general types of answers each woman received for her question.

Open the Door

This game helps the group members warm up to a discussion about the doors God has opened for them. You'll need a doorknob for this activity. Ask a simple introduction question, such as favorite hobbies or favorite meal. Pass the doorknob around the circle. The woman with the doorknob answers the question and then passes it on. Gradually make the questions more challenging or though provoking. The final question asks the women to share about the doors God has opened for them. You can also have them share how they have responded to those open doors.

Balloon Pop

This game is best in a large, open room. It gets the women moving. Before the women arrive, prepare the balloons. Each balloon needs to have a scripture promise that is written on a slip of paper inserted inside of it before it's inflated. Make each promise different because the women will share them at the end. Tie a string or ribbon about two feet long to each balloon. One balloon is tied to each player's ankle. The players try to pop one another's balloons without letting their own get popped. When a balloon is popped, the woman picks up her written promise and sits down. The last woman without a popped balloon is the winner. Share the promises with the group. This activity symbolizes the many times in life that "balloons" are popped, but God's promises are always there.

Photo Credits

About the Author

Based in the Midwest, Shelley Frost has been writing parenting and education articles since 2007. Her experience come from teaching, tutoring and managing educational after school programs. Frost worked in insurance and software testing before becoming a writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in elementary education with a reading endorsement.