Nair Hair Removal Tips

by Hannah Scott

Nair hair-depilatory cream removes hair in minutes and eliminates the need for razors and the possibilities of nicks and cuts, but using the depilatory incorrectly may leave you with a chemical burn instead. Below are some tips for using the product.

Application

As recommended by the directions that come with Nair hair-removal creams, test a small area on your skin before using the product to ensure that you won't have a reaction to the product. Take a shower or apply a warm washcloth before application to soften the hair and open the follicles. Apply the depilatory cream to the area; you don't have to rub it into your skin. Cover the hair with a thick, even layer of the cream. The chemical starts destroying the hair as soon as it is applied.

Waiting

According to Nair's directions, you can listen to a song on your favorite CD while you wait. Be ready to remove the cream in the order of which you applied it. For example, if you first applied the cream to the ankle of your left leg, then you will want to start removing the cream from that area first. Test a small spot to see if the hair has come off by using a warm, wet washcloth and gently wipe away the cream. Do not press hard as this will irritate your skin, already irritated by the chemical. If the hair does not come off, apply some depilatory cream to the spot and wait a couple more minutes, but do not exceed 10 minutes.

Removal

Removal of the depilatory cream with the wet washcloth in a sink basin or the shower should be gentle yet firm. If you have a flexible showerhead that you can hold, then removal of the depilatory cream will be a simpler process. Wipe off the cream gently with the washcloth as you run the water over your skin. If your showerhead is stationary, you'll need to keep soaking the washcloth to wipe away the cream and wringing it out afterward, repeating the step until you've wiped away all the cream and the removed hair. Rinse your skin thoroughly in warm water and pat dry—do not rub dry.

About the Author

Hannah Scott has been a freelance writer for more than 12 years. Scott's first published article appeared in "The Mountain Press" in 1999. She has also written for the "Tennessee Star Journal" and several websites, including RAE Magazine.