How to Repair a Torn Lambskin Leather Coat

by Baptist Johnson

A lambskin leather coat makes a nice addition to your wardrobe, so maintaining it should be a priority. A tear in your leather coat can ruin it, making it practically worthless. For large tears, consult a professional to have your coat altered and fixed. But for tears smaller than two inches, save yourself time and money and repair your torn leather coat yourself.

Items you will need

  • Lint-free cloth
  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Scissors
  • Leather repair kit (leather patch, fabric glue)
  • Leather dye kit
  • Leather conditioner
Step 1

Clean the area surrounding the tear using a lint-free cloth and alcohol. Allow the alcohol residue to evaporate.

Step 2

Trim the tear into an even circle or oval using a pair of scissors. Don’t widen the tear too much. Cut only as much leather fabric as necessary.

Step 3

Place the leather coat on a work table so the tear is facing up. Situate the leather patch from the repair kit over the tear.

Step 4

Cut a filler, using scissors, from the leather patch large enough to cover the tear. The patch filler should be at least one-sixteenth of an inch larger that the tear on all sides.

Step 5

Apply the leather glue from the repair kit to the underside of the patch. Place the patch directly on top of the tear. Center the patch on the tear so that one-sixteenth of an inch of the patch surrounds the tear on all sides.

Step 6

Allow the glue to dry over a 24-hour period. Put the coat in a safe place where it will not be disturbed.

Step 7

Trim the patch so that it is flush with the coat. Using scissors cut off the one-sixteenth of an inch of the patch that surrounds the tear.

Step 8

Dye the filler patch to match the color of the leather coat using a sponge and dye. Avoid placing dye directly on the patch, unless the directions advise it. Instead, apply the dye to a sponge and use the sponge to gently blot the filler patch. Applying too much dye to the leather can permanently discolor your coat.

Step 9

Allow the dye to dry, which may take several hours. Treat the patch and the surrounding area of the coat with a leather conditioner after it is dry.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

About the Author

Baptist Johnson was first published in 2000 when a poem he wrote won first prize in a local writing contest. He also writes and edits for Etched Press Society, a micro-publishing company based in Wilmington, N.C. Johnson has a Bachelor of Science in business administration from East Carolina University.