How to Repair Sheepskin Slippers

by Mason Howard ; Updated September 28, 2017

Because they are extremely warm and comfortable, sheepskin slippers often suffer much use and abuse. Over time, tears or holes can occur in the sheepskin. Instead of discarding your favorite slippers or spending the money on a new pair, patch them with the help of a leather repair kit. Repair kits are available from most leather supply companies, and include leather adhesive, patches and various other necessary supplies. Make sure the kit you buy comes with patches that are the same color as your slippers.

Clean the slippers with a damp rag. If the slippers are heavily soiled, a suede cleaner and conditioner or a sheepskin shampoo can be used. Allow the slippers to dry before proceeding.

Cut a section of the patch from your repair kit so it is slightly larger than the hole or tear. Apply adhesive to the backside of the patch and slip it into and under the hole or tear, adhesive side up, so that it sticks to the underside of the sheepskin. Push the hole or tear together, press down on the patch and allow the adhesive to set. A patch is not absolutely necessary. If the hole or tear is quite small or if you are unable to get to the underside of the sheepskin, this step can be skipped.

Fill in the hole with a thin layer of the leather repair compound. Spread on the compound using the small knife that comes in the kit. Allow the compound to dry. The leather compound dries clear, soft and flexible.

Spray the area with the leather spray and brush the area with a suede brush to restore the original nap.

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About the Author

Mason Howard is an artist and writer in Minneapolis. Howard's work has been published in the "Creative Quarterly Journal of Art & Design" and "New American Paintings." He has also written for art exhibition catalogs and publications. Howard's recent writing includes covering popular culture, home improvement, cooking, health and fitness. He received his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Minnesota.