How to Repair a Handbag Lining

by Lane Cummings

Even if a handbag's lining rips, you don't have to take in the bag for an expensive professional repair.

handbag image by Cristian Ilie Ionescu from Fotolia.com

The lining of a handbag is protected from the outside world, but it still has to deal with a slew of personal belongings that jumble, scratch and stain. The lining of a handbag can rip as it comes in close contact with such pointy objects as house keys, tweezers, scissors, pens and hair pins. Luckily, you don't have to live with a tear in the lining of a favorite purse, and you don't have to get it professionally repaired.

Items you will need

  • Seam ripper
  • Sticky interfacing
  • Scissors
  • Iron
  • Thread
  • Needle
Step 1

Grab the lining inside of the bag near the rip. Pull it toward you. Using the seam ripper, tear open a few stitches from the bottom of the lining. This will allow full access to the inside of the lining.

Step 2

Cut a square of sticky interfacing or adhesive fabric that is as long as the rip and as wide. Peel off the backing from the interfacing. Place it behind the rip on the inside of the lining. Adhesive patches can be bought in fabric stores.

Step 3

Pull each side of the rip over the sticky interfacing so the edges are touching. This should conceal the sticky interfacing.

Step 4

Place an iron on medium heat over the now-concealed rip. Iron over it. This makes the sticky interfacing bond to the cloth. If you have a rip near the top of the purse, use a towel to cover the handbag's hardware or leather to protect them from the iron.

Photo Credits

  • handbag image by Cristian Ilie Ionescu from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."