How to Remove Gigi Honey Wax

by Kim Sarah ; Updated September 28, 2017

Gigi is a brand of wax used for hair removal. It is safe for all types of skin. Like other brands of home waxing products, Gigi can be found at almost any beauty or drug store. The kits are fairly inexpensive and make home waxing fast and convenient.

The down side is that waxing can be a messy process. It drips easily and dries quickly. Therefore, you will want to know these steps so that you can get it cleaned off almost any surface

Soft Surface

Scrape away hardened chunks of the wax. Use a butter knife to pick it off of surfaces such as carpets or clothing. This will most likely remove all of it. If there is still some remaining, move on to the next step.

Moisten an old towel -- one that you don't mind ruining -- with drycleaning solvent. Dab the surface with the towel to break up some of the wax.

Place another clean old towel over the wax-covered surface. Rub a warm iron over the towel. Check every 30 seconds or so, to see the condition of the surface and if the wax is coming off. Rub the surface with the iron until all of the wax has softened. Use the towel to wipe away the softened pieces. Note that this step may damage or permanently ruin your towel.

Dab the surface again with the towel moistened with drycleaning solvent. This will remove any other little pieces of wax. Let the surface air dry.

Hard Surface

Scrape the large pieces of hard honey wax off the surface. Slide the back of a butter knife under the wax pieces.

Blow warm air from a hairdryer over the surface. This will soften any remaining pieces that are still stuck. Soft wax will be easier to detach from the surface.

Scrape the softened wax off of the surface. A paint scraper will work well for this task. Work gently so you don't scratch the surface.

Rub the surface with a dryer sheet. The texture and the chemicals contained in this sheet will remove any small pieces of waxy residue from a hard surface.

Photo Credits

  • Pamela Follett/Demand Media

About the Author

Kim Sarah has been a writer since 2000. Her work has appeared on NECN, WCTR-TV3 and in the "Torch" university newspaper, among other publications. Sarah received a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Worcester State University and a Master of Arts in journalism from Roosevelt University. She is also studying nursing and computer science at Indiana State University.