How to Remove Fusion Hair Extensions

by H.C. Hisel

Fusion hair extensions are one of the most popular methods of hair extensions. They’re well loved for their realistic appearance along with the very minimal damage they produce. Approximately 25 strands of individual hairs are attached to a small piece of your actual hair. They’re attached using a waxed based keratin protein. Unlike many types of extensions, fusion extensions can be removed by yourself, within seconds.

Items you will need

  • Alcohol Based Gel
  • Hair Clips
  • Pliers
Step 1

Section your hair using clips. When extensions are applied there is a section of your hair referred to as the “red zone”. This is wear no extensions are applied so that they won’t show through when you pull your hair up. Clip away your hair within the red zone, which is located all along your hair line and approximately two inches in. Separate the remainder of your hair into 3-5 horizontal rows for an easier removal process.

Step 2

Apply an alcohol based gel to your fusion bonds. Alcohol loosens up the protein bonds allowing you to easily break them. Work on one bond at a time. Rub a small amount of alcohol based gel between your thumb and pointer finger. Once you have rubbed the gel between your fingers to heat it up, continue to rub the gel onto one of your bonds.

Step 3

Crush the bond with pliers. Immediately after you have rubbed alcohol based gel onto a bond use pliers to crush the bond. Place the bond between the two points of the pliers and apply a generous amount of pressure for approximately five seconds.

Step 4

Slide away the bonded hair. After crushing the bond give the extension a small tug. The extension should start to slide away quite easily. If it doesn’t, crush the bond with pliers once more. Slide the extension all the way off of your actual hair and the bond will fall away with it.

Step 5

Finish the removal process. Continue removing one fusion bonded extension at a time. After you have successfully removed all of the bonds wash your hair. Follow a washing with a deep conditioning treatment.

About the Author

H.C. Hisel has worked for the past nine years as a professional writer, dancer, musician, painter and photographer. Hisel had her own weekly newspaper column in the Banana 411, a newspaper for kids. Her articles have been published in various print markets and online, including Trails.com and Golflink.com.