How to Keep Boots from Scuffing

by Robert Russell

Boots range in price from relatively inexpensive to very expensive. The function of some boots is purely utilitarian, to protect our feet as we walk or hike. The purpose of other boots is purely aesthetic, they are intended to make a fashion statement. Scuff marks on hiking boots is not a serious problem, however, ending up with scuff marks on a high-priced pair of accessory boots can be a major obstacle when you have to look perfect for a meeting or formal affair.

Items you will need

  • Cream or paste shoe polish
  • Shoe cleaner conditioner
  • Taps
  • Cloth
Step 1

Polish the boots when you first buy them with a cream or paste shoe polish. Cream and paste shoe polishes moisturize leather which helps to keep the leather more flexible. Wax polishes, on the other hand, tend to cause the leather to dry out over time making the boots more susceptible to scuffing.

Step 2

Clean the boots and apply a shoe cleaner conditioner. Routine cleaning and applying a conditioner also helps to keep the leather more moist and supple. Shoe conditioner and cleaners are sold at shoe and boot stores. Apply the conditioner with a damp cloth. Allow the boots to air dry.

Step 3

Put taps on the tips of the boots. Boots that have natural leather soles and pointy tips are easily worn down from general use quickly leading to scuff marks. Make an appointment with a shoe cobbler to have taps put on the bottom pointed tips of the shoes.

Step 4

Modify your walking habits. Scuffing usually occurs as the boots rub against each other as we walk or when the boots bump into rough edges and other obstacles by accident. Paying more attention as you walk around can be bothersome but it is worth the effort if you are wearing an expensive pair of boots.

Photo Credits

  • Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images

About the Author

Robert Russell began writing online professionally in 2010. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and is currently working on a book project exploring the relationship between art, entertainment and culture. He is the guitar player for the nationally touring cajun/zydeco band Creole Stomp. Russell travels with his laptop and writes many of his articles on the road between gigs.