Different Ways to Say "Thank You" for the Invite

by William McCoy

Responding to an invitation to a wedding or some other event requires an understanding of how to properly say thanks for the invite and note whether you plan to attend. Typically, you share this information by making the proper notation on the invitation's RSVP card, but you can also express thanks with a short, handwritten note.

Add Note to RSVP Card

When you reply to a formal invitation by filling out the RSVP card, place a check next to the appropriate line. Although the wording can change based on the invitation, it's typically a version of "accept with pleasure" or "regret that we are unable to attend." Many people add a short greeting on the RSVP card as a way to say thanks for the invitation. "Thanks for inviting us -- can't wait to attend!" is a suitable message to add.

Enclose a Short Note

If you have a close relationship with the hosts of the event to which you're invited, it's appropriate to include a short, handwritten note in the same envelope as the RSVP card. Keep your message short because the host will be handling lots of mail. It's acceptable to write that you can't wait to attend the event and that you appreciate being invited.

Decline the Invitation

You can still express thanks when you can't attend the event. Check the appropriate box on the RSVP card and include a short, personal note to express your thanks for being invited but briefly explain why you aren't able to attend. You don't need to go into too much detail. An appreciative note such as, "Thank you so much for thinking of us, and I'm sorry we won't be able to be there. We'll be out of town for a family engagement," is appropriate.

Make a Quick Call

Calling to express your thanks, regardless of whether you're able to attend the event or not, provides a personal touch. Call the host and say thank you for the invitation and share some enthusiasm about the event. For example, say you can't wait to share the fun at the upcoming baby shower or that you feel honored to attend the wedding. Keep your call brief, as the person's schedule might be busy with planning the event.

Photo Credits

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About the Author

Toronto-based journalist William McCoy has been writing since 1997, specializing in topics such as sports, nutrition and health. He serves as the Studio's sports and recreation section expert. McCoy is a journalism graduate of Ryerson University.