How to Weave Bracelets

by Jonae Fredericks

The art of weaving has been around for ages. Bracelet weaving can be a fun craft for kids on long summer days A camp favorite is weaving 'friendship' bracelets. Not only is it an inexpensive craft, but it also requires minimal materials. Bracelet weaving will keep kids busy for hours, and they love to share these woven treasures with their friends!

Items you will need

  • Embroidery thread
  • Masking tape
  • Tabletop
Step 1

Cut 6 strands of embroidery thread in your desired colors. Cut pieces should be at least 30 inches long.

Step 2

Gather the strands together and tie a knot at one end.

Step 3

Place the strands on a table with the knot at the top. Tape the strands to the table with masking tape at the knotted part. The knot should be taped securely to the table, while the long pieces remain free for weaving.

Step 4

Take your first strand farthest to the left and wrap it over and around the second strand. Pull tightly to create a knot.

Step 5

Repeat step 4. You should now have two knots tied around strand two.

Step 6

Drop the second strand, and pick up strand three. Now wrap strand one over and around strand three, once again making a knot. Repeat to create a second knot around strand three.

Step 7

Repeat the same series of knots on the final three strands. When all of the knots are completed, your original strand one will now become the final strand on the right, as opposed to the original first strand on the left! This will complete your first row.

Step 8

You can now continue adding more rows by following the above steps, until your woven bracelet is complete.

Tips

  • Your knots should always be pulled tightly to alleviate any bulging in your rows.

Warnings

  • When your woven bracelet is complete, you will need to tie it around your wrist. Always make sure that your bracelet is never tied too tightly. There should always be at least two fingers width of extra space between the bracelet and your skin.

About the Author

Jonae Fredericks started writing in 2007. She also has a background as a licensed cosmetologist and certified skin-care specialist. Jonae Fredericks is a certified paraeducator, presently working in the public education system.