How to Stimulate Beard Growth for Men

by Lindsay Haskell

Males start growing facial hair when they begin puberty. Mustaches generally grow in early in the puberty years, then hair emerges on the cheeks and spreads across the chin into a beard. The speed of facial hair growth mostly depends on your genes. However, there are some techniques that stimulate faster growth. The rate of facial hair growth also tends to increase with age; young men who start out with scant facial hair often notice it fills in and grows faster as they get older.

Step 1

Ensure you are intaking vitamins and minerals specified as beneficial to hair growth in your daily diet. These include vitamin A, vitamins B3, 5, 6, and 12, vitamin C, vitamin E and Biotin.

Step 2

Increase your protein intake. Hair, like fingernails and toenails, is composed of proteins. Hair growth can increase with increased protein intake.

Step 3

Get enough of sleep every night. Your body utilizes this time to repair and restore. This includes growing hair.

Step 4

Decrease the amount of stress in your life. Stress slows down hair growth and for some people, it makes hair brittle and can even cause chunks of it to fall out. Regular exercise, yoga and meditation, as well as laughing and deep-breathing are all good methods for handling stress.

Step 5

Lift weights to increase testosterone production. High testosterone production during puberty is what stimulates initial facial hair growth. As such, increasing your testosterone levels may stimulate beard growth beyond adolescence. Anaerobic exercise, such as weight lifting, and sleeping at least eight hours per night and avoiding tobacco facilitates testosterone production.

Warnings

  • Be careful you do not take too much of a vitamin or mineral, as this can harm your health. Check recommended daily intake levels and stay within them.

Photo Credits

  • Tay Jnr/Digital Vision/Getty Images

About the Author

Lindsay Haskell began writing fiction and nonfiction in 2008. Her debut novel, "Grace," is to be published in January 2011. Having lived in five different countries and traveled across five continents, Haskell specializes in Third World social and political issues, with a concentration in the Darfur conflict. She is currently a first-year student at Wellesley College studying history, Africana studies and English.