How to Make Edible Wax

by Dan Richter

Edible waxes made with natural ingredients are a safe and natural form of hair removal.

Steve Mason/Valueline/Getty Images

It’s not uncommon for both men and women to wax various areas of their body as a means of hair removal. Many of these areas, such as arms and legs, need to be waxed every few days. The costs associated with hair removal can add up, however, and become expensive. According to the American Laser Centers, the average woman will spend approximately $23,000 on body waxing in a lifetime. There are waxes that you can make fairly easily at home that are both inexpensive and edible.

Items you will need

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • Small saucepan
  • 2 cups sugar
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • ¼ cup water
  • Candy thermometer

Sugar and Honey Wax

Step 1

Place the sugar and honey into a small saucepan. Cook the sugar and honey at medium heat on your stovetop, stirring often. Bring the mixture to a boil and reduce heat to low.

Step 2

Cook the sugar and honey mixture until the sugar has completely melted. Continue stirring the mix to ensure it is thoroughly incorporated and remove from heat. Allow the wax to slightly cool down before using.

Step 3

Test the temperature of the wax mix. Dab a small amount on onto the back of your hand. If it doesn’t burn you, it is safe to use on your skin for waxing. Leftover wax may be stored in a refrigerated, airtight container and heated up again later.

Egyptian Sugaring Recipe

Step 1

Place the sugar, lemon juice and water into a small pot. Cook the sugar and honey on low heat on your stovetop, stirring constantly. Monitor the mix to ensure it doesn’t scorch or bubble over.

Step 2

Place a candy thermometer in the saucepan. Monitor the temperature on the candy thermometer while continuing to stir the mixture. Remove the saucepan from heat when the candy thermometer reaches 250 degrees.

Step 3

Test the temperature of the wax mix. Dab a small amount on onto the back of your hand. If it doesn’t burn you it is safe to use on your skin for waxing. Leftover wax may be stored in a refrigerated, airtight container and heated up again later.

Photo Credits

  • Steve Mason/Valueline/Getty Images

About the Author

Dan Richter began freelance writing in 2006. His work has appeared in a variety of publications, including the "Wausau Daily Herald," "Stevens Point Journal," "Central Wisconsin Business Magazine" and the "Iowa City Press-Citizen." Richter graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts in communication and media studies.