How to Fix Squeaky Leather Boots

by Jessica White

No matter the grade of leather, fixing squeaky boots is a quick process.

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Squeaky leather shoes are fine on a gymnasium floor, but they can be highly annoying when walking across the floor of a conference room. It is hard to inspire confidence when you sound like a dog's squeaky toy. When shoes squeak, it is usually due to part of the heel being attached incorrectly. This can happen to boots, flats and heels for both men, children and women. It might take a couple of tries to fix the issue, but fixing squeaky leather boots only takes a few simple steps.

Items you will need

  • Baby powder
  • Petroleum jelly or silicone spray
  • Hammer or screwdriver
Step 1

Pry up the insole of the shoe; it can always be glued back into place. Sprinkle baby powder onto the heel, making sure to sprinkle enough that the whole boot heel is covered. Set the boot aside for 24 hours to allow the baby powder to absorb any moisture that could be causing the leather to squeak against the sole or side of the boot. After the desired length of time, knock the excess powder away from the heel and reset the insole.

Step 2

Pry up the insole of the shoe. Apply petroleum jelly under the insole around the perimeter of the shoe. Apply just enough to lube the edges, somewhat like applying grease to a squeaky hinge. It will reduce the friction caused by the weight of your body pressing against the sole, which then presses against the leather shoe. If you do not have petroleum jelly, use a silicone spray. It should not harm the leather, but check the manufacturer's label to be certain before using.

Step 3

Examine the heel of the boot. Wiggle the heel with your fingers. If there is any give, or you can hear the squeak emanating from the heel of the boot, pry up the insole and press the heel against a flat surface. If the nails or screws that hold the heel onto the shoe are lose, tighten them with the appropriate tool. A squeak can be heard even with the screw being one or two turns loose, so be sure everything is tight before reapplying the insole.

Tips

  • If these methods don't work, take your leather boots to a cobbler.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

About the Author

Jessica White has been teaching English and reading to high school students since 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Ill. White has written several articles, recaps and reviews for TVOvermind.com and has been writing semi-professionally since 2006.