How to Eat Smoked Oysters

by James Clark

Items you will need

  • Smoked oysters
  • Fresh or dried dill weed
  • Cream cheese
  • Crackers
  • Peppercorns and grinder
  • Tabasco or other hot pepper sauce
  • Lemon juice
  • Oyster knife

Smoked oysters are a delicacy that will satisfy either as an appetizer or an entree, in sufficient quantity. Store-bought smoked oysters are typically packed in a metal tin like sardines and are ready to eat. Smoked oysters at a seaside restaurant may be grilled over hot coals and smoked with sea grasses, dried grapevine, apple wood or perhaps tea leaves.

Step 1

Remove a smoked oyster from the tin or carve the smoked oyster out of the shell with an oyster knife, cutting along the neck of the oyster to free it from the shell.

Step 2

Eat the oyster by itself or place on a cracker and top with the condiments of your choice. Some people prefer a few drops of Tabasco sauce on their oysters, while others enjoy a pinch of dill. A twist of cracked peppercorns adds a quick bit of zest. Variations can include a drop of salsa, or you can dredge the smoked oysters in 1/2 cup of bourbon and eat them with cocktail forks.

Step 3

Prepare a smoked oyster spread by dicing 1 cup of smoked oysters or chopping them coarsely with a food processor, then adding an 8 oz. package of cream cheese and two tablespoons of lemon juice. The spread serves four as an appetizer.

Step 4

Mix the oysters and cream cheese thoroughly, then sprinkle cayenne pepper or chipotle chili powder on top. Serve with crackers or crusty French bread.

Tips

  • Unless you are accustomed to enjoying a lot of shellfish at a sitting, consider limiting yourself to a dozen smoked oysters until you can gauge the gastrointestinal effect they may have on your body.

Warnings

  • Smoked oysters should be cooked thoroughly during the smoking process and be firm to the touch. Eating raw seafood can pose health risks, including bacterial contamination.

About the Author

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.