How to Clean Polo Boots

by Samantha Volz

Leather boots can get dirty.

Man's leather boots on a thick sole on a white background image by terex from Fotolia.com

Polo boots are designed to handle the wear and tear that comes from being worn and loved. Made of sturdy leather, the boots are weather-resistant and can provide warmth, dryness and comfort. But they cannot resist the buildup of dirt over time, and will occasionally need a good cleaning to keep them looking and feeling their best.

Items you will need

  • Soft cloth
  • Water
  • White vinegar
  • Leather cleaner
  • Leather conditioner
Step 1

Dampen a soft cloth in lukewarm, clean water. Wipe away dust, dirt or other buildup with the soft cloth.

Step 2

Mix equal parts white vinegar and lukewarm water. Dampen a soft cloth with this solution and dab onto the Polo boot to remove stains. Rinse with a rag dampened in clean water to remove any residual vinegar.

Step 3

Apply a professional leather cleaner if necessary for stubborn stains. These products are available at leather and shoe retailers, and will penetrate into the leather to remove tough stains. Wipe on in thin layers with a soft cloth.

Step 4

Allow boots to air dry away from heating vents, radiators and other sources of heat. Direct heat can cause the leather to dry out and crack.

Step 5

Condition the boots with leather conditioner or mink oil once the boots are completely dry. Rub the oil into the leather with a soft cloth, paying close attention to seams. Wipe away any excess conditioner with a clean, soft cloth; buff with the same cloth to obtain a polished look. Allow the boots to air dry.

Warnings

  • Never clean suede boots with any liquid-based cleaner; suede will quickly absorb any liquid. Use rubber-tipped or plastic-tipped brushes or pencil erasers to remove stains from suede boots.

Photo Credits

  • Man's leather boots on a thick sole on a white background image by terex from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Samantha Volz has been involved in journalistic and informative writing for over eight years. She holds a bachelor's degree in English literature from Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, with a minor in European history. In college she was editor-in-chief of the student newspaper and completed a professional internship with the "Williamsport Sun-Gazette," serving as a full-time reporter. She resides in Horsham, Pennsylvania.