How to Carmelize Walnuts

by Leanne Clute ; Updated September 28, 2017

Caramelized walnuts are simple to make and add flavor to pasta dishes, chicken and salads.

big and small walnuts on walnut leaves image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com

Caramelized walnuts make a sweet yet healthy snack that can be enjoyed alone or on top of yogurt, salads or pies. Making caramelized walnuts at home is only a few simple steps but can be altered to achieve different flavors for the nuts to compliment different types of meals.

Basic Caramelized Walnuts

Heat 2/3 cup of sugar and ¼ cup of water in a large saucepan over medium-low heat.

Bring sugar mixture to a boil. Stir frequently to prevent burning with a nonstick rubber spatula. When mixture is ready, it will appear a golden-brown color.

Stir in 1 cup walnuts, halved, and fold until all nuts are covered.

Line a baking sheet with waxed paper. Pour covered nuts onto the waxed paper. Break up clusters and press flat with a spatula.

Allow to cool completely before enjoying. Store nuts in a cool, dry place until ready to be eaten. Use storage containers or sturdy sealable bags to prevent insects from being attracted to the sugar.

Sweet N’ Spicy Caramelized Walnuts

Repeat Steps 1 and 2 of Section 1.

Add 1 tsp. each of vanilla, cinnamon and salt to heated sugar mixture. Stir over very low heat until well blended.

Fold in 1 cup walnuts, halved.

Pour nuts onto a greased baking sheet or baking sheet lined with waxed paper.

Allow to cool completely before enjoying.

Hot N’ Spicy Caramelized Walnuts

Repeat Steps 1 and 2 of Section 1.

Add 1 tsp. each of wasabi powder and ginger to the sugar mixture.

Fold in 1 cup walnuts, halved, into mixture. Mix until nuts are fully covered.

Pour nuts onto a greased baking sheet or baking sheet with waxed paper on top.

Allow to cool completely.

Tips

  • Add 1 tsp. of your favorite spices and seasonings for different flavor effects on the caramelized walnuts. Caramelized walnuts can be a healthy and energy boosting treat for children and adults. Agave nectar can be used as a substitute for sugar in a low-sugar diet.

Photo Credits

  • big and small walnuts on walnut leaves image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Leanne Clute started writing in 2009 with her work published in several magazines, including "All About Golf," "All About Snow," "All About Bikes," "All About Four Wheels" and "All About Outdoors." She holds an Associate of Science in mortuary science through Hudson Valley Community College, where she is also pursuing a Bachelor of Business in business management.