How to Address Birthday Invitations

by Lacey Dixon ; Updated September 28, 2017

Addressing birthday invitations property is critical when preparing your invitations. There are certain rules of etiquette to use when preparing to mail your invitations. Many computers have programs that can guide you through printing and addressing birthday invitations. After your guest list has been created and addresses have been gathered, take the time to address your invitations properly.

Collect the addresses of the persons you wish to invite to your birthday party. If you are unsure that an address is correct, it's always best to call and ask.

Type your addresses using a word processor document. Many word processors have a template that can be used specifically for formatting and typing multiple addresses. If you have good penmanship, you can address the invitations by hand for a more personal touch.

Type the full first and last names of the persons you are sending invitations to. Do not abbreviate street or state names. Include the appropriate titles for each person: Mr. and Mrs., Mrs., Miss, Dr., or Dr. and Mrs. The names of a married couple should appear as Mr. and Mrs. John Doe. If your invitation is being sent to a child, the name should appear as Mr. Kid Doe or Miss Fawn Doe.

Print the addresses on sheets of printer-ready address labels. You can choose from colored or clear labels. Some personal printers will allow you print the addresses directly onto your envelopes. Check your printer to see if this option is available to you. If so, addressing the envelopes is as simple as typing your addresses using the appropriate template, loading your printer with the number of envelopes needed and printing from your word processor.

Affix your labels to the envelopes.

Tip

  • Remember to add the appropriate postage before mailing your invitations.

About the Author

Lacey Dixon has been writing professionally since 2005. She writes and edits newsletters for her family's wild-bird business in London, Ky. Dixon holds a Bachelor of Arts in insurance and risk management from Eastern Kentucky University.