How Often Should Black Women Moisturize Their Hair?

by Diana O'gilvie

In its natural state, black hair is very curly and dry. When chemicals are applied for straightening, the hair needs different moisturizing techniques. How often black women moisturize their hair depends on its texture.

Black Hair Care Basics

Special care must be taken when dealing with black hair. Regardless of whether hair is in its natural state or relaxed, one woman's head can contain several hair textures. Wash your hair every week and half. If you wash more frequently than that, the oils will dry out. Once a month treat your hair to a deep conditioner or a hot oil treatment.

Add protein to your hair care regimen to maintain moisture. One of the most common types of protein is a leave-in conditioner. Apply it before any oils so the absorption isn't blocked.

Relaxed Hair Moisturizer Tips

If you treat your chemically straightened hair with care, it will grow strong. The chemicals already weaken the hair because they strip the scalp of its natural oils. For moisture-rich hair, sleep with a satin scarf to avoid split ends from hair getting caught on a cotton pillowcase. When conditioning, comb out hair to prevent tangles. Massaging hair daily will generate circulation and oil production.

Avoid applying heat. The high heat from curling irons, blow dryers and flat irons will sap hair of moisture. Don't use petroleum jelly on your scalp; it will block the pores and hair growth.

Natural Hair Moisturizing Tips

Natural black hair tends to get brittle if not moisturized. Use naturals oils like olive, avocado and jojoba every day to penetrate the scalp and make hair softer. A good method is the conditioner-only method. Apply your favorite conditioner to dry hair and cover it with a shower cap for at least half an hour every two weeks.

About the Author

Diana has been a freelance writer for five years now. She enjoys writing about travel, health and fitness. Diana holds a Master of Arts degree from Long Island University in Media Arts. She currently lectures for the Communication Arts Department at Dowling College in Long Island, New York.