What Are the Functions of a Facial Machine?

by Kathryn Pless

Facials can help you to have younger looking skin

Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of D. Sharon Pruitt

Receiving a facial can be a relaxing and soothing experience. Regular facials may help give you younger looking skin. A facial machine has various functions that can help stimulate or sooth the skin. In the hands of a qualified professional, a facial machine can produce excellent results.

Ozone Steamer

Steam is useful before a facial to soften your skin and open your pores. This helps to deep clean your face and stimulate circulation. Steam is directed toward your face and ozone is added into the stream. Ozone is thought to have therapeutic properties and may have a healing effect on skin.

Exfoliation

Most facial machines come with brush and sponge attachments. Cleanser is applied to your face and a technician moves the brush or sponge gently over your face. The brush or sponge rotates to remove dirt and dead skin cells.

Vacuum

A small vacuum attachment is placed over a tube that creates suction. After your face is cleansed, the technician applies the vacuum attachment to your face. This is normally a small flat glass attachment that is used to remove the cleanser, dirt, and dead skin after cleansing.

Massage Attachment

A small disk can be attached to the same wand used for the cleansing brush or sponge. This is used to massage the facial muscles under your skin. Facial massage stimulates circulation and can be very relaxing.

Electrotherapy

Weak electric current may be applied to treat certain facial conditions. Galvanic current is used to help soften blackheads before removal. Galvanic current is also used to help move water-soluble products into the skin. Faradic and sinusoidal currents are used to stimulate facial muscles. High-frequency current has a germicidal effect that can help treat acne.

References

  • Milady's Standard Cosmetology, 2005

Photo Credits

  • Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of D. Sharon Pruitt

About the Author

Kathryn Pless lives in rural Florida and is a licensed cosmetologist and nail technician. She has had articles published in Nails Magazine and also had poetry published in The Sandhill Review, the literary journal of Saint Leo University.