How to Use an Indoor Electric Grill

by Diane Watkins

Items you will need

  • Non-stick spray or oil
  • Paper towels
  • Tongs

Indoor electric grills come in several styles and sizes. Built-in grills heat up quickly and get hotter than countertop models. Higher-power models are desirable because they are capable of higher heat. Countertop models come in open grill styles and contact models. Contact models have dual cooking surfaces and heat from the top and bottom at the same time, cooking twice as fast as open models. Open grill styles are capable of only moderate heat and may not sear meat the way you prefer. With all styles, make sure the grill is hot before adding the food.

Step 1

Preheat the grill to medium-high. Allow 10 minutes to be sure the grill is hot before adding the food. Keep the grill and cords away from water or other liquids.

Step 2

Season the food with salt and pepper. Marinate if desired. Drain away marinade and pat dry on a paper towel before grilling.

Step 3

Brush or spray the grill with oil to prevent sticking. This is not necessary on a non-stick grill, but is recommended when grilling delicate foods like fish or recipes with sticky sauces.

Step 4

Place the food on the grill and lower the lid if there is one. Allow the food to cook half done on one side before moving or turning it. Indoor grills with lids will cook both sides at once and will take less time to cook.

Step 5

Turn the food with tongs halfway through the cooking time on an open grill. Contact grills cook both sides at once, but you can turn the food 45 degrees to develop grill marks, if desired.

Step 6

Check meat for doneness with a meat thermometer.

Step 7

Unplug the grill when cooking is finished, before cleaning.

Tips

  • Use an outlet with a ground fault circuit interrupter.

Warnings

  • Keep the grill away from flammable materials.

    Inspect the cord for damage and wear before using.

References

About the Author

Diane Watkins has been writing since 1984, with experience in newspaper, newsletter and Web content. She writes two electronic newsletters and has a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Clemson University. She has taken graduate courses in biochemistry and education.