How to Make Homemade French Onion Dip

by Molly Thompson ; Updated September 28, 2017

French onion dip and plain potato chips were a staple at parties and gatherings for much of the 1970s, '80s, and '90s. Anyone could fix this crowd favorite by blending a packet of onion soup mix with some sour cream. Modern tastes have broadened, as have the varieties of dips and dip mixes available, but onion dip remains a crowd-pleaser. Whip up your own version from scratch for your next party.

Heat a thin layer of olive oil in the saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the diced onions and a little salt and saute them until the onions are soft and translucent. Stir the onions to make sure they brown evenly and cook them until they turn light to medium brown. Remove the caramelized onions with a slotted spoon, allowing excess oil to drain off, and set them aside in a small bowl. Allow them to cool completely.

In a medium bowl, mix equal parts of mayonnaise and sour cream as your dip base. For a healthier alternative, use plain Greek yogurt. Add several teaspoons of the onion powder, about a third as much garlic powder, and small amounts of salt and pepper. Sprinkle in some Worcestershire sauce and blend all of the ingredients thoroughly. For an extra zesty onion dip, add a splash of lemon juice or hot pepper sauce.

Add the cooled caramelized onions to the dip and mix it gently but thoroughly. Reserve a few spoonfuls of the onions to garnish the dip before serving, if you like.

Tightly seal and refrigerate the finished dip for several hours to allow the flavors to blend. Top the dip with the reserved sauteed onions or sprinkle dried onions on top for crunch. Serve the dip with fresh vegetables, crackers or chips.

Tip

  • You can also caramelize the onions by sprinkling them with olive or canola oil and kosher salt, then baking for about 45 minutes in the oven, stirring occasionally.

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About the Author

As a national security analyst for the U.S. government, Molly Thompson wrote extensively for classified USG publications. Thompson established and runs a strategic analysis company, is a professional genealogist and participates in numerous community organizations.Thompson holds degrees from Wellesley and Georgetown in psychology, political science and international relations.