How to Find a Place to Live When Relocating to Another State

by Brock Cooper

Finding a place to live in a new state requires planning.

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Where Are You Going to Live?

For many people finding a job locally is not an option, or they may just want a new life or new direction outside their current area. It's a difficult decision, but once it's made, moving can be an exhilarating experience. Relocating can be a difficult process, whether you're moving one state over or across the country. Moving to a new area requires careful planning. It takes time to find the right place to live, especially if you have children.

Timing Is Important

Consider how much time you have to move to the new state. In the case of a new job, you may have only a few weeks versus a personal decision that gives you weeks or months to make a decision on a new home. The more time you have the better decision you are likely to make.

Weigh the Pros and Cons

Write down everything you need in a new home, including type of neighborhood, number of bedrooms, kind of schools, yearly tax estimate and price range. Prioritize what's most important to you and decide where it's okay to compromise. Contact various Realtors from throughout the state, if you are not sure where you want to live, or from the specific area you have targeted. Have them send information on available housing for sale or rent.

Narrow Down the Search

Examine the information thoroughly. Narrow down the results to a select few. Call the Realtor and get more information about the neighborhoods, taxes and schools from the areas you selected. Keep a few rental homes or apartments on the list in case you cannot find a home to buy in the time available.

Check It Out In-Person

Visit the area and tour the homes with the Realtor. If this is not possible because of cost or distance, have the Realtor take and send as many pictures as possible on every aspect of the homes. Consider whatever you decide without getting onsite to be a temporary fix and make sure that you do not sign a long-term lease. Good Realtors consider the buyer and seller and make certain both parties will be happy. However, their number one priority is to make the sale.

Make An Offer

Once you've found a home that might be right for you, it's time to make an offer. If you choose to rent, there may be less room to negotiate, but if it's a purchase, do your homework. Find out what homes in the area have sold for in the last six months. If it's a seller's market, your leverage may be limited but you don't want to overpay. When your offer has been accepted you can move forward on a purchase and sales agreement and get ready to own in your new hometown.

Photo Credits

  • Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

About the Author

Brock Cooper attended Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, Ill. He was a reporter for seven years with a daily in Illinois before branching out into marketing and media relations. He has experience in writing everything from press releases to features on a variety of subjects and forums. His work can be seen in NewsTribune newspaper, Chicago Parent magazine and several websites.