How to Write a Newspaper-Ready Wedding Announcement

by Gina Story

Many newspapers social editors will allow you to run your wedding announcement the way you want it to appear and will be grateful if you write the wedding announcement yourself. Writing your own newspaper wedding announcement is easy if you know what you’re doing.

Step 1

Call the newspapers that you’d like to submit your announcement to and ask which email address you should send your announcement to. Also ask about the publication fee. Some newspapers prefer a picture of the bride; others want a photograph of the bride and groom. The newspaper may have size and color requirements, so ask about them.

Step 2

Collect your thoughts and start writing the details including a description of the bride's and bridesmaids' dresses; the bouquet descriptions; first and last names of everyone in the wedding party and their hometowns; the name of the minister and any other information you’d like to include in your wedding announcement.

Step 3

Write the first paragraph of the wedding announcement. It should include both the bride and your groom's names, along with the day, date, time, and location of the wedding as well as who officiated the ceremony. Be sure to check the officiant's exact title and the spelling of his name

Step 4

Put together the second and third paragraphs. These should include the names of the bridal couple's parents and their hometown. This paragraph also may include the names of the grandparents. If the grandfather of the bride or groom is dead and the grandmother is alive, don’t write, “The bride is the granddaughter of the late Joe Smith and Mary Smith of Hudson,” because this implies that the grandmother is deceased as well. Instead write, “The bride is the granddaughter of Mary Smith of Hudson and the late Joe Smith.”

Step 5

Decide if you want to use the expression “given away.” For some brides, the notion of being given away is offensive. The next paragraph should tell who escorted whom. Here’s an example of how using both escorted and given away together would work. “The bride was escorted down the aisle by her father, and given away by her parents.”

Step 6

Describe the dress and bouquet but keep things simple. The bride will be pictured in the dress in the same announcement, so don’t waste space describing every detail. Be sure to hyphenate “chapel-length,” “finger-tip” and “A-line.” Ask the florist for the proper names and colors of the flowers. “Hand-tied” is commonly used to describe bouquets. It is hyphenated as well.

Step 7

Announce the wedding party, which should include the maid of honor, matron of honor, bridesmaids, best man, groomsmen, honorary attendants, ring bearer, flower girl, program attendants, guest register attendant and readers. Be sure to double check the spelling of their names and hometowns. If budget is a concern, just list those who stood up with the bride and groom. A sample paragraph would read: The bridesmaids were Joann Nightingale, friend of the bride, of Cornelius; Jasmine Smith, sister of the groom, of Larder; and Rayann Whitnel, cousin of the bride, of Jacobsville. Separate names, hometowns, and relationship with commas, and listings with semi-colons.

Step 8

Use the next few paragraphs to include anyone else that you’d like to have listed in your announcements. This would include the wedding planner and musicians. Keep the sentences short and simple because you are being charged by the line.

Step 9

Provide the details of receptions and any other parties in the next few paragraphs. This would include the time, date, and place of the reception, rehearsal dinner and perhaps the bridal showers. Be sure to mention who hosted the events.

Step 10

Consider including some basic information about the bride and groom's education and occupation. A sample paragraph would be: "The bride is a 2002 graduate of Appalachian State University and is employed as a teacher at Baton Elementary School."

Step 11

Write the last paragraph. This paragraph tells where the couple went on their honeymoon and what town the couple will reside in upon return. Don’t include the exact address because this can make your empty home a target for theft.

Tips

  • Check, double check and triple check all of the names and their spellings. Just because you've been best friends with a person all her life doesn't mean that her name is spelled correctly. It's easy to miss a key stroke. Make sure to spell-check and then recheck the spelling of the names.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/BananaStock/Getty Images

About the Author

GIna Story worked at The (Myrtle Beach) Sun News and at the Lenoir News-Topic, as well as doing freelance writing for advertising companies at time. During her nine years as a professional newspaper writer and columnist, Story wrote feature articles on home design, fashion, gardening and many other home and garden topics.