How to Protect Wedding Rings From Scratches

by Michelle Sauer ; Updated September 28, 2017

A ring box is a safe haven for wedding rings.

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A wedding ring is a symbol of marriage and is to be worn at all times. Sometimes, however, the ring would be harmed if it is not taken off. No fail-safe way exists to protect a wedding ring that is worn all the time, and the wearer should take care during activities that could damage the ring. Following preventative and maintenance measures can help to protect wedding rings from scratches.

Remove your ring and put it in a ring box before you use harsh chemicals. Harsh chemicals can wear away the protective enamel of your ring, which puts it at risk of scratches and other damage. If you do not want to take off your ring, then wear rubber gloves while cleaning.

Take off the ring before a physical activity such as playing a sport or doing manual labor. Such activities can cause severe scratches to a ring's surface to the point that the ring may not be repairable.

Remove your ring before washing your hands, applying hand or body lotion, or taking a shower. That will prevent buildup from soap and lotion residue on the ring. The buildup can affect the ring's protective enamel, leading to scratches.

Clean your ring weekly. Dirt particles on a ring's surface can create scratches and abrasions on the ring. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush and a small amount of mild cleaning detergent mixed with tolerably hot water to scrub the ring lightly. Wear rubber gloves to prevent burning your hands in the hot water. Rinse the ring thoroughly under the hot water after the cleaning, and dry it with a lint-free cloth.

Hire a jeweler to clean your ring annually. That allows potentially scratch-causing buildup and residue on the ring to be removed by a professional. A jeweler also can use magnifying tools that can reveal even the smallest scratch on the ring, which she can polish and buff out so that it doesn't worsen.

Tips

  • If you can't bear the thought of not wearing a wedding ring during an activity that could damage it, consider investing in a simple ring that you can wear during those times. It should be a ring that you don't mind scratching or damaging.

Photo Credits

  • Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images

About the Author

Michelle Sauer holds a bachelor's degree in journalism and mass communication from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She has been published in UWM's campus newspaper, where she was an editor, and online for Frontpage Milwaukee. Sauer is an editorial intern at Lessiter Publications. She has written for the "American Farriers Journal" and is a contributing writer for "Veil Magazine."