How to Make Synthetic Wig Shampoo

by Cristina Cole

Synthetic wigs are great for people on the go who want an easy fresh look every day. They're also wonderful for those who have lost hair due to illness. But just like real hair, wigs get dirty, oily and absorb odor. With just a few inexpensive ingredients, you can create a synthetic wig shampoo that leaves hair fresh, clean and soft. Use this shampoo a few times a month to ensure your wig lasts longer.

Items you will need

  • Sink filled with water
  • Woolite laundry detergent
  • Teaspoon olive oil
  • Teaspoon lemon juice
  • Wide-toothed comb
  • Wig stand
Step 1

Fill a pot with 10 cups of water and boil it so all chlorine and hard water deposits which can harm the fibers of a synthetic wig are removed. Boil water for five minutes, transfer to a bowl and put in the refrigerator. Only use cold water when washing a synthetic wig as warm or hot water can damage fibers.

Step 2

Plug your sink and pour in 5 cups of the cold, distilled water -- keep the other 5 cups for rinsing. Add a cap full of Woolite laundry detergent to the water and swish it around with your hand to mix it. Stir in 1 tsp. of olive oil to add shine and softness to the fibers, and 1 tsp. of lemon for a fresh scent.

Step 3

Submerge your wig in the solution. Gently move the wig around so all the hair is saturated -- avoid rubbing the strands, just move hair around. Take the wig out and lay it on a towel. Drain the solution and rinse the sink. Fill the sink up with the remaining 5 cups of distilled water. Submerge the wig and move it around as before to remove any leftover detergent.

Step 4

Remove the hair from the water. Place it on the towel, fold the towel over on the wig and gently press down to remove excess water. Give the wig a gentle shake and hang it on the wig stand to dry naturally.

Tips

  • To keep your hair clean longer, wear a wig cap so the oils from your scalp don't penetrate it as easily. Wash your wig after every six uses, every 10 uses with a wig cap.

Warnings

  • Never use hot water to wash your wig as the fibers can be damaged.

Photo Credits

  • Thomas Northcut/Photodisc/Getty Images

About the Author

Since 2005 Cristina Cole has been writing essays, speeches and blogs about beauty, fashion and frugality. She has written for FabulousSavings.ca and holds a Bachelor of Arts in English, world religions and women's gender studies from University of Toronto.