How to Cook on the Big Green Egg

by Jacob Queen ; Updated September 28, 2017

Steaks can have a great flavor when cooked on a grill.

meat on grill image by blaine stiger from Fotolia.com

The Big Green Egg is a very popular wood smoker that can also be used to grill. It's known for its ease of use and versatility with different kinds of cooking. The main key to its success is the ability to easily control and monitor temperatures, along with a wide variety of temperature ranges. People can use the Big Green Egg for everything from searing steaks to slowly smoking foods at very low temperatures.

Put lump charcoal into the Green Egg's firebox and start a fire. The company that sells the Green Egg also sells special paraffin wax and sawdust fire starters that make starting a fire easier. You can use either a match or a lighter to ignite the fire starters. You can also buy an electric fire starter for your Big Green Egg.

Close the Egg and monitor the temperature reading on the lid. Open the dampers wider to raise the temperature and close them to lower it. For searing, the temperature should be higher than 600 degrees Fahrenheit; for smoking, the temperature should be around 275 degrees. Some foods, such as whole pieces of chicken, need temperatures around 350 degrees.

Place your food in the grill. Some foods, like steaks, are cooked directly on the surface. Other foods need to be cooked on one of the accessories that allow for indirect heat, such as the plate setter, or the baking stone.

Close the grill and cook your food for the correct amount of time. Unlike many other grills, the Big Green Egg is always closed while cooking.

The amount of time for cooking varies depending on the food and the recipe. Some foods, like steaks, may cook in as little as 5 minutes at certain heat settings. In other cases, foods may need to cook for several hours. You may have to open the Egg at certain points to turn meats so that everything is cooked evenly.

Remove your food from the Egg and then put out the fire by closing the Egg and shutting the dampers so that no air can get inside.

Photo Credits

  • meat on grill image by blaine stiger from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Jacob Queen has been a professional freelance content creator since 2009. He has written articles on a variety of subjects for several online publications. He is also a guitarist, screenwriter and amateur filmmaker with more than 10 years of experience in each field. Queen studied English composition and literature at Truett-McConnell College.