How to Get Rid of Pimples Without Buying Creams

by Ann Jones ; Updated July 18, 2017

You don't need expensive creams.

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You don't have to buy expensive prescription creams, which can be excessively drying to your skin, to treat acne. Although late-night TV commercials regularly tout the latest acne treatment system, you may be able to treat pimples just as effectively with basic ingredients you already have at home. The items in your refrigerator and kitchen pantry can help get rid of your pimples, often without the skin irritation you may experience from commercial acne creams.

Cleanse your face daily with a mild, unscented facial soap. Look for a glycerin-based formula if you have sensitive skin. Use warm water to help dissolve dirt and oil, and always pat your face dry with a clean, soft towel. Used towels can harbor acne-causing bacteria.

Slice a ripe tomato and scoop out the pulp with your fingers. Spread it over your face, lie back and leave it on for up to one hour. Tomatoes are rich in citric acid, which is particularly effective for blackhead-prone skin. It helps bring these small oil clogs to the surface for easy removal.

Make your own toner by mixing three parts lime or lemon juice to one part water. The juice of citrus fruit is effective at drying up excess oil and leaves your skin feeling refreshed. Store the juice in the refrigerator and wipe it over your face with a cotton ball for a cool, soothing acne-fighting refresher.

Exfoliate your skin with baking soda. According to ArmHammer.com, a paste made of 3 tsp. of baking soda mixed with 1 tsp. of water is gentle enough to use every day. Exfoliating helps remove dead surface skin cells that can clog your pores and lead to pimples. Massage the paste onto your skin in a circular motion and rinse it off with water.

Make an effective acne spot treatment by crushing three uncoated aspirin tablets and adding a few drops of water to make a paste. For extra moisturizing and antiseptic properties, add a drop or two of honey. According to the New Zealand Dermatological Society, salicylic acid is a common ingredient in acne creams. Dr. Oz states that the salicylates found in aspirin are the same compound.

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About the Author

Ann Jones has been writing since 1998. Her short stories have been published in several anthologies. Her journalistic work can be found in major magazines and newspapers. She has a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing.