How to Top Off Your Unity Sand Vase With a Candle

by Samantha Hanly

Items you will need

  • Votive candle
  • Double boiler
  • Beeswax (or other candle wax)
  • Candle dye (optional)
  • Wire core wick

A well-thought-out unity sand vase is a lovely ceremonial object that, unlike a unity candle, can become a permanent keepsake. While candles burn away and are consumed, a sand vase can be preserved forever. The warmth, cheer and glow that candles bring to ceremonies cannot be replaced by a sand vase, however. By topping your sand vase with a candle, you benefit from the best of both ceremonial objects.

Step 1

Choose a smooth, white votive candle to place gently in the sand. Most of the vase is filled with decorative sand, so the candle only takes up the very top part. A tea light will also work well, but will not burn as long as a votive. Use an unscented candle for a wedding ceremony to avoid problems with any allergies your guests may have.

Step 2

Make a filled candle on top of your unity sand vase instead of purchasing votives or tea lights. Melt beeswax or other candle wax in a double boiler. Add candle dye, if desired, after the wax is completely melted. To test the color, drip a small amount of wax onto a white piece of paper. Add more dye if the color is not deep enough. If you wish to use beeswax but want a white candle, purchase bleached beeswax. Do not try to dye yellow beeswax white.

Step 3

Dip a piece of wire core wick into the wax and shake. This is to let out any air bubbles. Wait for the wick to cool (this will take a couple of seconds), then pull the wick strait. Push the bottom end of the wire core wick into the sand. Push it into the very middle of the sand.

Step 4

Pour hot wax on top of the sand. Wax will congeal on top of the sand. Be careful not to splash the wax when pouring, as it is difficult to remove wax splashes from the vase. Allow the wax to cool.

Warnings

  • Always use a double boiler to melt wax; it is the only safe way to melt wax.

About the Author

Samantha Hanly is an organic vegetable gardener, greenhouse gardener and home canner. She grows a substantial portion of her family's food every year. After receiving her bachelor's degree, Hanly embarked on a career teaching dramatic arts, arts and crafts, and languages. She became a professional writer in 2000, writing curricula for use in classrooms and libraries.