How to Tie a Chuck Taylor Like a Gangster

by Lane Cummings

There are an example of Chuck Taylors tied in a traditional manner.

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Basketball footwear has come a long way since A.G. Spalding developed the first basketball shoe in 1900. The basic style of this first shoe -- a rubber sole and canvas top -- is still popular today and has even evolved to be a common element of urban basketball footwear. There are numerous ways to lace and tie your shoes, and while there is no correct style of lacing up your footwear, trends in pop culture help guide the way you may want to lace them up.

Step 1

Fold one set of shoelaces in half. Insert one end of the shoelace into the top right eyelet and the other end of the shoelace into the top left eyelet.

Step 2

Pull the ends of the shoelaces down towards you, creating a horizontal band across the top two eyelets of the shoe. The remaining ends of the shoelace should be equal.

Step 3

Smooth out the right end of the shoelace and place it into the top of the left eyelet, forming a diagonal. Take the left end of the shoelace and place it into the top of the right eyelet, forming a diagonal. Together, the shoelaces make an X shape.

Step 4

Continue in this manner, crisscrossing your shoelaces, stopping at the seventh eyelet. This means that six of seven pairs of eyelets should have the laces running through them.

Step 5

Pull the tongue of your basketball shoes outwards. Tie the laces in a knot or small bow behind the tongue. The tongue will hide the knot or bow you make. When worn the shoes should look loose, but you've actually secured them well to your feet.

Tips

  • To achieve this style, your laces cannot be twisted or folded.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Creatas/Getty Images

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."