How to Smoke Buffalo Meat

by Shailynn Krow

Items you will need

  • Smoker
  • Buffalo roast, pretrimmed and cleaned
  • Meat thermometer
  • Dry rub
  • Wood chips, mesquite or hickory
  • Prepared marinade, optional
  • Basting brush
  • Heat-proof pan
  • Aluminum foil

Buffalo, like other game meats, have a very distinct taste. Smoking buffalo meat can help add a different flavor profile to that wild meat, but it should also be paired with a flavorful rub if you want to get away from the gamy taste. Like most game meats, buffalo can easily dry out when it is cooked and it is best to never cook it well done.

Step 1

Preheat the smoker using presoaked wood chips to 225 degrees F using the manufacturer’s instruction for preheating your model of smoker.

Step 2

Use a flavorful dry rub and cover the roast on all sides. Do not rub the spices into the flesh of the buffalo, but pat them in.

Step 3

Place the buffalo roast into the smoker using the middle rack.

Step 4

Baste the buffalo roast every hour using a prepared marinade and a basting brush to help reduce the gamy taste. However, do not use a marinade if you like the gamy taste.

Step 5

Use a meat thermometer to check on the buffalo roast’s temperature. The roast should reach 135 degrees F before it is removed from the smoker. Make sure the smoker stays at a consistent 225 degrees F during the cooking process and adjust the heat accordingly throughout. The roast will take six to eight hours to cook, depending on its weight.

Step 6

Remove the roast when it reaches the proper temperature. Place it in a heat-proof pan, and cover the roast with aluminum foil. Allow the roast to sit for at least 10 minutes before carving.

References (2)

Photo Credits

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About the Author

Shailynn Krow began writing professionally in 2002. She has contributed articles on food, weddings, travel, human resources/management and parenting to numerous online and offline publications. Krow holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and an Associate of Science in pastry arts from the International Culinary Institute of America.